Posts Tagged ‘wildlife’

Blue Mormon, Common Mormon

July 17, 2018

The Common Mormon does not have blue
Whether it’s the UP or UN you view.
The female Common Mormon can pose
An appearance like the Crimson Rose.
But if the UP of the Blue Mormon you view
And look at that pattern of blue
The larger size will make you stare
As this beauty floats through the air.
These differences are, I tell you, true
Between the Mormon, Common and the Mormon, Blue!

Blue Mormon

blue-mormon-main

Common Mormon

IMG_7916

Common Mormon female mimicking Crimson Rose

IMG_1802

Advertisements

Do’s and don’ts for photographers on nature/wilderness group walks

July 9, 2018

I just read Janaki Lenin’s well-written list of do’s and don’ts on nature/wilderness walks.

Since so many of the participants are photographers, I’d like to add my own list of do’s and don’ts for them. This list does not list the obvious points of ethical photography, though those must be followed too…it deals with how people should do photography while in a group.

Do not stray away from the group in pursuit of the photograph. Group leaders often find it hard to trace errant members, and even in scrub jungle, which looks tame and domesticated, it is easy to get lost, particulary on cloudy days when the cardinal directions are not clear.

If you find something interesting, do (quietly) let the others (or at least your neighbours) know about it. Clicking away in silence while others wonder what you have in your viewfinder…is not A Good Thing

When you find something interesting, and step up to take your photograph, remember to check if you are getting in anyone else’s way. Many people wind up taking photographs of the backs of eager beavers who have stepped into the frame, intent on their own photography.

If you have a good zoom on your camera, do allow others to go closer.

Do not, in your eagerness to get closer, chase the subject away, so that others in the group get neither a good look nor a photograph.

Remember that others with smaller cameras and lenses, and mobile cameras too, are as much photographers as the ones with the bazooka lenses.

Silence your camera shutter sound. It’s very impressive to hear the machine-gun sounds of a burst of shots, but it can chase away an alert animal or bird. It can also spoil someone else’s video.

Do not keep interrupting the walk to show others your shots from this, or other, walks. Chimping (the process of looking at one’s shots) can be done after the walk (or by yourself, if you want to check on something.). Showing other people your shots is fine if they have, for some other reason, missed seeing the subject, and want to see it.

Do take some shots yourself, and as fast as you can, allow others to get to your particular point, so that they, too, can take their images.

I once heard someone say, “I am glad I got the shot, and I am even more glad no one else got it.” If this is your point of view, then nature walks in groups are not for you. To get unique shots, go by yourself. You may get those shots, but I assure you, you will miss out on the camaraderie, the multiple opportunities, and the safety benefits that group walks have to offer.

On watching the butterfly migration….

June 7, 2018

They fly, severally, across my path

Fluttering on their way.

“Godspeed, you little butterflies,”

Is all that I can say.

How far they come, these little ones

Creatures of light and air

With so many obstacles to face,

Who knows how each will fare?

Will this Crow make it across?

Will that Tiger survive?

Flying over in their hundreds,

How many will live, and thrive?

How many will fall, becoming the food

Of predators, swift and alert?

How many will survive attacks

And flit on, torn and hurt?

I do not how many will make it

But each one flying is a lovely sight.

I pray that these brave little beauties

Are able to survive the flight!

Small-scale warfare….Valley area, 050518

May 7, 2018

On our way back from our nature/birding outing, I suddenly caught sight of a beetle and a snail, on a tiny twig. Seeing these two together isn’t very common, so I decided to photograph the scene.

IMG_6823

I then realized that what was going on was an attack, and a major war! The beetle, like all ground beetles, likes a snail diet, and was attacking this one.

IMG_6813

IMG_6818

This was an amazing drama that we watched for a while. The beetle was attacking the snail, which produced the froth in self-defence.

Whenever the beetle approached the snail, it would get caught in the froth and would go off with a little bit in its mouth.

IMG_6813

You can see this here:

IMG_6809

The snail obviously had nowhere to go, given its speed of locomotion, and its postition at the end of the twig. It had to fight.

Having got just a mouthful of froth for its efforts, off the beetle would go, up the twig, try to get rid of it, and return to the fray,er, froth!

IMG_6805

Such miniature fights-to-the-death happen all the time, around us…in the parks, in our own gardens. All that is needed to endramatically interesting moments is a little observation!

Book review: The Last White Hunter, Reminiscences of a Colonial Shikari

April 26, 2018

The Last White Hunter, Reminiscences of a Colonial Shikari

By Donald Anderson, as told to Joshua Mathew
265 pp.
Rs.650

Indus Source Books
PO Box 6194
Malabar Hill PO
Mumbai 400 006
INDIA
Email: info@indussource.com
http://www.indussource.com

Readers who are interested in the wildlife history of India, and in particular, of the Melagiri and Bannerghatta forests near Bangalore, will be familiar with the name of Kenneth Anderson, a “shikari” (hunter) of the old school. The series of books that he wrote, on his various wildlife encounters, were very popular reading at one time.

His son, Donald Anderson, was brought up in the same tradition as his father, and grew up to be a hunter. But he differed from his father in two important respects: Kenneth Anderson, even in those days, slowly turned from hunting to conservation, and was also a widely celebrated author. Donald, by his own admission in this book, says that he could not hold the interest of a reader.

But since Joshua Mathew found that the life of Donald Anderson (with the line of Scotsmen dying with him when he passed away in 2014) was interesting enough for him to write this book, giving a voice and a narrative to Donald.

This task was no easy one. As Joshua recounts at the end of the book, Donald had become a recluse, not wanting to meet anyone; or he would agree to meet them only if they would take him on a “hunt” (or at least, to the locations where he used to hunt.) A parsimonious nature and a spendthrift tendency combined to make Donald perpetually hard up, depending on others’ help and scorning it at the same time.

Joshua got past these defences and allowed Donald to talk about his life. He also sifted through unimaginable amounts of pack-rat junk to sort out photographsand other material that he could use for the book.

This biography is not a linear book; Depending on what is being talked about,the book jumps backward and forward over the span of Donald’s life, However, the narrative is always clear, and as one moves through the pages, one learns of Donald’s life and times…his education, the places he stayed in, his family, friends, his own leanings and beliefs (or lack of them), his great love for the outdoors, the jungles, and for shikar.

It is not easy to adopt the voice of another person (especially one whose views one may not share) but Joshua does this with remarkable felicity. There is an absolute lack of a judgemental attitude throughout the book. When Donald himself repents something, that is conveyed; but there is no moralistic tone adopted about Donald’s actions, whether it is his extensive hunting, or his varied love life.

The book is like a bamboo basket; various incidents and interludes are woven together loosely, without the need to make a close-knit whole. In this way, a reader can dip into the book at odd points, and not have to “follow the narrative” as one would have to do with conventional books.

The language of the book is lucid and simple. Very often,Joshua uses Donald’s own words;at other times, words are carefully chosen so that the writer’s thoughts and opinions do not colour the character’s, in the narration. At the same time, descriptions of jungles, of the homes that Donald lived and grew up in, are detailed and extremely interesting. it takes one back to days when the culture, the mores and the lifestyles of those in Bangalore were very different from those of today.

And the differences are striking indeed. “There was no concept of traffic”, says Donald, and adds that he could travere across the length and breadth of what is today’s Bangalore, travel up to Ramnagara or to other parts of Bannerghatta. The life of the white (and “Anglo-Indian” _communities were very different from the Indian communities made up on the people who served them. Indeed, the book underscores a fact that holds true even today; there are two discrete Bangalores; the one of the Cantonment area, and the one of the traditional Kannadigas, and they rarely touch each other. Dances, drinking parties, convent schools and excursions..these constitute a life far different from that of the Kannadiga communities.

The incidents and anecdotes are neatly docketed into eight chapters, and they make very interesting reading. As a person who lived in the Cantonment area (Convent Road in Richmond Town) before moving to Kannadiga Bangalore, and seen the city transform from a sleepy, leisurely hamlet to today’s frenetic, groaning-at-the-seams metropolis, I can relate to a lot of things and places that Joshua mentions, in Donald’s voice. The amazing thing is that some of these places, and customs are there, in that part of Bangalore, even today.

Remarkable though Joshua’s achievement is, I do have apprehensions that the times, and values, that are described in Donald’s voice, have completely passed away, and there exist, now, at least two generations who think very differently. Since our wildlife is now decimated, today’s values make it a crime to hunt our wild creatures; and a resurgence of prudish Victorian morality would make several readers click their tongues over the accounts of Donald’s prolific romatic encounters, which were all short-termed, by his own admission.We certainly seem to be less tolerant of what we perceive to be aberrations, today, and an account of how to skin and animal and stuff it, I am afraid, will not be very popular with the majority of today’s reading public.

But if one is willing to look into history without being judgemental, and read details about how life was lived in this city in the days around the time of Indian Independence, both in terms of wildlife and lifestyles, then this book would be a great read….which is what I found it to be. I salute Joshua Mathew on a job very well done; it is Donald Anderson, and Donald alone, who speaks from the book. It is only at the end that we hear Joshua’s voice, and even then, he sets down the quirks of the shikari’s personality, warts and all, allowing us to see the man as he was..a product of his times, with unique talents….a person who was true to himself, and did not whitewash his own shortcomings. On another level, anyone interested in how the wildlife scenario was in Bangalore and its environs, nearly a century ago, would find this both a fascinating (seeing the abundance of wildlife) and depressing (seeing the hunting/shooting culture) read…but a compelling one in any case.

A good job well done, Joshua..and I wish you would reconsider your decision to make this your last book!

4th Sunday outing, March ’18, and bird census: Hoskote kere, 250318

March 27, 2018

Email to bngbirds egroup:

IMG_3107

I had been toying with the idea of making Hoskote kere the venue for the 4th Sunday outing, when the email from Swaroop and his team arrived, announcing the bird count there. That made the decision easy, and several of us gathered at 6.30am at the Gangamma temple on the bund of the lake.
IMG_3120

We had a good mix of experts and newbies, children and adults, binoculars and bazookas 😀

IMG_3124

Swaroop and his team

IMG_3122

sent us in several directions, to see what we could see, and document what we saw. The paths were as as follows:

Dipu K, et al: north west edge
Rajneesh Suvarna, et al: Raghavendra Talkies
Vinay Bharadwaj, et al: east edge
Ashwin Viswanathan. et al: west edge:
Deepa Mohan, et al: Meeting point plus south-west edge

I was happy to take the children from Om Shri School along, as part of the initiative to involve schools.I found the children very interested; they patiently learnt how to use my binoculars, used the scope often, and asked a lot of questions too. I was able to show them almost all the birds that we sighted, and the bird scope was used well!

I started off with group, looking at the woodland birds in the plant clutter on both sides of the road. As the mist slowly lifted, we walked down the path with the lake waters along both sides. I have never before been able to walk past the "isthmus" that juts out into the water; in fact, a couple of months ago, the lake was so brimful of water that birders could not go down at all, and had to be content with birding from the bund along the Gangamma temple.

Robins, sunbirds, prinias and others were pointed out but then we got a few Baillon's Crakes

IMG_3157

in the water hyacinth at water level, and most of us got busy clicking these usually skulky and shy birds, which will soon begin their migration.

IMG_3169

IMG_3169

Garganeys

IMG_3237

But our "regulars"….the Spot-billed Pelicans, Little Grebes, Coots, and Herons (like this Grey Heron)

IMG_3119

kept us all occupied as we watched them. There were Black and Brahminy Kites in the air, joined by a lone Marsh Harrier, another winter visitor which was looking for prey. Rosy Pastors

IMG_3212

flew over the water and settled in the dry trees. We saw Barn Swallows,

IMG_3256

as well as the Red-rumped, Wire-tailed, and Streak-throated variety.

It was nice to see both kinds of Jacanas, Pheasant-tailed

IMG_3223

IMG_3221

and Bronze-winged,

IMG_3198

in the lake; similarly, Yellow, Grey and White-browed Wagtails flew around. One "dip" was the Pied Kingfisher, but we spotted the Small Blue and the White-throated Kingfishers.

Glossy Ibis

IMG_3209

Blyth's Reed Warbler

IMG_3204

Schoolchildren, along with the teacher, using the scope and binoculars

IMG_3235

Our group

IMG_3258

The children of Om Shri School

IMG_3263

Sandpipers, too, made their appearance, flying around with their typical calls. We noted Egrets, both Intermediate and Small. Spot-billed Ducks and Garganeys flew over the water and settled down, and were quite easy to show to the children. In fact, I was wondering if the children, or the schoolmaster who accompanied them, could take so many names thrown at them at the same time! I know I would have found it difficult to remember. But their interest did not flag, and after a certain point, it was I who had to call them back to return. It is very satisfying to be able to show people a whole lot of birds on their first outing!

Ants

IMG_3246

Water cabbage, an acquatic plant:

IMG_3185

Line-up of many of my group:

IMG_3267

Valli and Janhvi helped me with the app and physical paper entries, and we had to catch up with the bird names every now and then, as each of us spotted different birds! It was nice to have a problem of plenty.

Fish caught at the lake is sold on the bund every morning.

IMG_3268

Children on the lake reaches

IMG_3183

An array of snacks, including Manoj's mom-made alu parathas, kept us going.

IMG_3240

Return we did, to a hearty breakfast provided by the Karnataka Forest Department (KFD).

IMG_3269

Some of the teams whose transects were further afield did not return for a while, but all of us were very satisfied birders that morning! It sometimes happens that some paths have less birds ( on a census/bird count, it's our duty just to record what see, whether the numbers are lower or higher) but it's a great feeling when everyone returns with a satisfactory count of species. One group sighted the Eurasian Wryneck, which is a new bird-sighting for this lake.

Thanks to Valli, I met Arun and his friend, from the Andamans, and they gave us insights into the birding scene where they come from.

Our grateful thanks to Swaroop and team who provided us a great opportunity to see the variety of birds that Hoskote kere has to offer. Swaroop, Praveen and Nagabhushana say that 126 species were sighted during the morning, by over 120 volunteers! A big thank you for providing this opportunity for the 4th Sunday outing.

IMG_3276

Fishing boats

IMG_3118

For the next few months, we will concentrate more on the resident birds in and around our city, and bid goodbye to our winter visitors.

The eBird checklist for my group is

here

Swaroop will provide the links to the other checklists.

I have put up my photographs (not by a DSLR camera, and not only birds…there is even a photo of some beautiful ants!) on my FB album,

here

Cheers, Deepa.

Bannerghatta National Park, Monthly Bird Survey, 100318

March 13, 2018

Since I was not able to go for the inaugurual (Feb ’18) monthly bird survey, I went to participate in the March survey.

The survey is across four ranges, Anekal, Bannerghatta, Harohalli and Kodigere, and will be held on the second Saturday of every month for a year, to give a holistic picture of bird life in the Bannerghatt National Park over the annual period.

IMG_1973
Birds of Karnataka, display board at Kalkere.

IMG_1978
Volunteers gathering for the survey

I got the Kalkere State Forest transect, BTL (Bannerghatta Transect Line) 1. My team-mates were:

Forest Guard Michael
Albert Ranjith
Byomakesh Palai
Pervez Younus

IMG_1980
Michael, Pervez,Byomakesh, Albert

We stopped every 10 minutes, took the GPS co-ordinates, and then moved on.

IMG_1991

The Kalkere State Forest was much more productive in terms of birds than I thought it would be, because the city has actually spread beyond this forest patch now.

IMG_2025

We passed some quarried rock, which gave a sad look to the landscape.

IMG_2024

However, the good thing was that the depressions had formed rock pools:

IMG_2019

Our trail was quite scenic, even if it was not heavy forest:

IMG_2033

However, the scrub forest was very interesting, and we got several birds. Here are some I managed to click.

Greater or Southern Coucal, drinking water at the edge of the rock pool:

IMG_2022

Oriental White-eye:

IMG_1988

Shikra:
IMG_2002

Green Bee-eater:

IMG_2011

Jerdon’s Bushlark:

IMG_2052

Black-winged Kite:

IMG_2038

Oriental Honey Buzzard:

IMG_2045

Indian Peafowl (this is a peacock in the glory of full breeding plumage):

IMG_2014

Vipin was our organizer for the Bannerghatta range, and I found him very sincere and hard-working. Here he is, taking notes with a forest guard:

IMG_2032

An excellent breakfast of iddli was provided midway through the transect:

IMG_2036

I did not restrict myself to observing only the birds; here are some other interesting beings:

Milkweed:
IMG_2043

Peninsular Rock Agama:

IMG_2044

Two unidentified but beautiful flowering plants:

IMG_2046

This was a tiny plant growing in the path!

IMG_2007

An un-id insect with huge eyes:

IMG_2059

A dragonfly:

IMG_2034

the Flame of the Forest, Butea monosperma, in full bloom:

IMG_1989

Tired, but mentally refreshed by the morning, and the beauty of the scrub forest

IMG_2012

I left for Mysore to take part in the Ranganathittu Bird Census the next morning.

The Flickr album of the survey is

here

and my FB album is

here

Nature Feature, Feb ’18: A wildlife art exhibition and competition, 280118 to 010218

February 2, 2018

I first met

Prasad Natarajan

in 2014, when we attended a wildlife volunteer training program together. Even then, in the beautiful environs of Kudremukh,Karnataka, I always found him with a sketchpad and a pencil in his hands.

Since then, his artwork, especially on the theme of wildlife, has become quite well known. He is not afraid of using the most difficult and unforgiving of art media, such as Indian ink (lampblack collected in a container and mixed with grease, and applied carefully to paper.) He is now an artist whose work finds homes across the world.

However, Prasad decided to step beyond displaying his own talent; in March 2017, he conceived the idea of mounting an exhibition and competion of wildlife art. In a city which has many wildlife events, including wildlife photography, this w the first such exhibition; indeed, it is probably the first such competition-cum-exhibition in the country. Artists from all over the country, and abroad, sent in their work to be exhibited. The event finally came to fruition and was held at the Venkatappa Art Gallery in Bangalore, from January 28th to February 2nd, 2018….almost a year of hard and unremitting work.

Mounting such an exhibition was not easy. Prasad first reached out to the fraternity of wildlife artists, asking if they would like to show their work. Several artists responded, and after he shortlisted the participants, sent him their pieces, which he stored in his own home, taking the utmost care of them. “The artists sent me their works in all kinds of frames and sizes,” he smiles reminiscently. “Transporting them to the gallery, and back, was one of the major logistics hurdles. We hired a mini truck for all non-glass-framed artwork, and a car for all pieces with frames. Most of the art works were taken back by the artists at the gallery, but the remaining pieces, which are from outside Bangalore, will be couriered back to the artists.”

Did he have anyone to help in all this? Prasad points gratefully to Sree Latha P., an artist whom he met at several art events. She volunteered to help, designing the brochure, and cheerfully working on the many details that cropped up. “Certainly,” he says, “Next year, I cannot increase her burden; I am going to need more volunteers to help me!”

23 artists participated, with Prasad curating the work to be displayed. In a show of solidarity, 18 of them were present at the show opening. Prasad named the event “Artists for Wildlife and Nature, Annual Wildlife Art Show” (AWN for short).

Here are the artists from Bangalore who participated:

artists group, 300118

He invited Hemlata Pradhan to judge the art and prizes were awarded as follows:

Artist of the Year Award Winner- Sweta Dilip Desai
Mammal Category Award Winner- Eric Ramanujam
Landscape Category Award Winner-Prabal Mallick
Avian Category Award Winner-Prahlad Hegde
Student Category Award Winner- Daksesh D Velu

The young students who participated were Daksesh D Velu, Neha Satish, Vidisha choudhary, Kuruganti Naga Priyanka and Gowri L Jadhav.

Here are some of the awardees:

prizewinners, Artists for Wildlife and Nature, 300118, Blr

Supporters included five-year-old artist Nisha!

nisha, 5 yrs, Art for Wildlife and Nature, 300118

The pictures displayed covered a remarkable variety of media used. A few sculptures by Eric Ramanujam were also part of the show.

Jainy Kuriakose, the Chief Guest (who is a superb photographer, and has travelled extensively to document the rarest of birds), gives away the prize to Sweta Desai:

jainy kuriakose and awardee sweta, art and wildlife for nature, 300118

Sweta, and her father, who are from Goa, as well as artists like Prahlad Hegde, wore delighted smiles at the exposure their art was getting, with over 600 people visiting the exhibition over the four days.

Prasad, having put together the show successfully, welcomed the gathering at the opening:

prasad natarajan, art and wildlife for nature, 300118

A large gathering of luminaries from both wildlife and art circles attended the event. Nearly Rs.55,000 was recorded in sales. For artists who are looking for their first commercial break, this was heartening indeed.

However, though the rates charged by Venkatappa Art Gallery are extremely reasonable, Prasad sounds a note of warning about the booking process. ” We officially booked the gallery two months before the show,”, he says. “But what I did not notice was that the dates need to be entered six months prior to the show in the gallery register. This was a pencil entry by the person in charge of the gallery. When I went to make the final arrangements, I found that the last date (2nd Feb) had been erased, and the gallery rented out to someone else.” Since even ink-entries might be erased by a whitener, it might be better to take a photo of the register entry on one’s mobile phone, and keep that as proof of the dates the gallery has been booked for.

To see images of and by the artists, and guests who visited the exhbition, you can see Prasad’s FaceBook album of the event,

HERE

Crows using vehicles to crack seed pods! Ragihalli, 211017

December 5, 2017

I had read about how crows put nuts and seed pods in the way of approaching vehicles on roads and then eat the cracked nut.

here

is a very erudite study which does not rule out the possibility of crows using vehicles in this way, but suggests that they only drop the nuts on the road to crack them.

However, at the Ragihalli sheet rock area in the Bannerghatta National Park, on 21 Oct. ’17, we observed a Jungle Crow which definitely seemed to use the oncoming vehicles to crack the tamarind seeds that it was bringing, and then going to the road to eat the exposed soft tamarind.

Here’s the crow, which deliberately (and fearlessly) the crow leaves the seed pod and flies off only when the vehicle is almost upon it.

Here, the crow flies in after the vehicle has passed. You can clearly hear the excellent description of the crow’s behaviour by my friend Aishwary Mandal in the video.

Birding is not “ticking off” birds that we’ve seen…it’s also watching and learning more about the feathered creatures around us…sometimes they surprise us with what they do.

Savandurga, 081017

October 11, 2017

It was just four of us: Padma, Ramaswamy, Srini and I… who decided to go to

Savandurga

on a misty monsoon morning.

IMG_2133

Sign in Kannada for our destination:

IMG_2130

The mist in the trees…

IMG_2119

Which slowly cleared up:

IMG_2076

Our activities attracted a lot of attention!

IMG_2089

We did see a lot of birds…here are some.

Black Drongos

IMG_2081

This Ashy Prinia presented a cartoony view.

IMG_2069

Green Bee-eater with dragonfly catch

IMG_2125

Laughing Dove

IMG_2132

The butterflies were out in force, too!

Yellow Orange-tip

IMG_2139

IMG_2190

Dark Blue Tiger

IMG_2155

Plain Tiger caterpillar

IMG_2090

Pointed Ciliate Blue

IMG_2157

IMG_2175

Common Wanderer

IMG_2182

Dark Grass Blue

IMG_2165

Common Gull

IMG_2187

Here’s Srini, delighted with the way a butterfly trustingly climbed on to his finger (if one wipes one’s perspiration off, they are attracted to the minerals in the fluid)

IMG_2253

That was the Pointed Ciliate Blue again.

IMG_2250

Some of the insects we saw included this White-tailed Damselfly

IMG_2108

and this beautiful Copper Beetle (at least, that’s what I named it!)

IMG_2113

Wildflowers were varied and plentiful.

IMG_2111

Here’s a lovely Balloon Vine:

IMG_2123

Mexican Poppy

IMG_2137

Gossypium sp (Mallow)

IMG_2239

Waterlilies in a pond

IMG_2268

Even seed pods can look stunning

IMG_2263

Mushrooms

IMG_2100

Dabbaguli was one of the places we stopped at

IMG_2068

And just outside the town, we spotted a bonus…the Jungle Nightjar!

IMG_2145

IMG_2143

IMG_2146

Padma brought her tasty cutlets, and we feasted on them

IMG_2140

Later we also had some local breakfast.

IMG_2207

We stopped near two old temples, the Shaivite sAvaNdi veerabhadraswAmy and bhadrakAlamma temple

IMG_2218

and the Vaishnavite Lakshmi Narasimha temple

IMG_2225

Here’s narasimhA, the man-lion avatAr of Vishnu, with His consort Lakshmi, who is his laptop…

IMG_2231

The deities were being taken out in procession, which was a nice bonus.

IMG_2266

This life-like dog in a vendor’s stall nearly had me fooled.

IMG_2228

Part of this temple seemed lost in dreams of another time….

IMG_2215

Some rather risky rock-climbing was going on.

IMG_2226

The scenery was stunning:

IMG_2213

IMG_2199

IMG_2200

It was on the rocky outcrop in the centre that we spotted three Egyptian vultures.

IMG_2291

IMG_2289

IMG_2283

IMG_2280

We returned home, well pleased with our morning, stopping to say “bye” to this Oriental Garden Lizard which also seemed to be having a swinging time.

IMG_2312

Looking forward to the next weekend outing…!