Posts Tagged ‘water’

In the water, in the sun, Lalbagh, 090418

April 9, 2018

Put your head out of the water.
Get a bit of sun.
Try to get some breakfast…
Without becoming one!

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Lalbagh, 9 Apr ’18

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T G Halli, 260617

June 27, 2017

A last-minute decision, and six of us, including a birder from Noida, Delhi, who will be moving to Bangalore in a while…off we went, in the predawn dark, to T G Halli Reservoir.

Padma Ramaswamy, Akhilesh Sharma, G S Ramaswamy, Y S Prasanna, Sudha Mahalingam

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It’s getting harder for me to categorize these outings as birding trips, as there is always so much more to observe and enjoy. Just watching the lush greenery that has sprung up after the rains, with the waters reflecting the scudding monsoon clouds, lifts the heart and
brings such joy.

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As we descended towards the water, we were stopped, literally in our tracks, by a Pioneer bush. This was one where the leaves had all been stripped away by the caterpillars of the Pioneer butterfly,

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which had then pupated on the branches and twigs.

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Many of the butterflies had just emerged or were emerging…

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and those which had taken on their new form were flittering around the bush. We could not help watching this dance of new life for a while.

There was also a bird’s nest in the middle of the bush.

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As we walked along the banks of the reservoir, the birds did not disappoint us, either. Beautiful little Indian Silverbills made music scores on the wires.

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Spot-blilled Pelicans, which are now resident birds, floated on the surface,

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…as did Little Grebes and Common Coots. Cormorants…Little, Great, and the distinctive Indian…flew and swam around, occasionally diving beneath the surface in search of food.

Ashy-crowned Sparrow Larks

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and Tawny Larks

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flitted about the landscape.

Ashy Prinias went about picking up prey and going to their nests.

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A Little Ringed Plover sat on a mud flat.

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Since it is the time of year when we can only see RBI (Resident Birds of India!), we watched two Spot-billed Ducks, and a Clamorous Reed Warbler. However, some Tawny Larks, flitting about, a Whte-browed Wagtail behaving according to its name, added to our list, as did this White-browed Bulbul.

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At one point, the sounds were much more than the actual sight of the birds! The Common Hawk Cuckoo called its complaint of “brain-feeever!”, Tailorbirds, Flowerpeckers (presumably the common Pale-billed variety) and Sunbirds added their calls, Grey Francolins and Red-wattled Lapwings (we did see some later) punctuated the general bird song with their phrases, too. We heard the trilling calls of the Green Bee-eaters long before we saw any.

Both the woodland and the water birds continued to delight us as we walked along. At two spots, active colonies of Baya Weaver nests were being constructed.

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We watched these residential layouts taking shape, and also being inspected by the prospective owners (is there a word such as “owneress”? as the inspectors were the ladies!)

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Flying between the nesting tree and the thorny date palm behind, the birds kept us quite occupied.

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It was business as usual for the contract fishermen on the lake.

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The birding was interrupted by more “buttering” (as Rohit Girotra says, if birdwatching is birding, then butterfly-watching is buttering!) as Pioneers, Crows, various Blues, Pansies, and others flew about us, mud-puddling and also basking in the weak sunshine.It’s not often that one gets to photograph the Blue butterflies with their wings open, and we made the most of the opportunity.

Forget-me-not

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Blue Pansy

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Plains Cupid

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Common Banded Awl

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Indian Skipper

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Grass Yellow

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Common Leopard

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We observed some insects, too, such as this Blister Beetle

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this Green Marsh Hawk Dragonfly

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and this Jewel Bug

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this caterpillar

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a Day-flying Handmaiden Moth

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Even the common Housefly can be beautiful up close!

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But a further treat awaited us a little further. Two juvenile Green Bee-eaters, which have, apparently, not (yet) developed any fear of humans, sat quite close to the path, and flew around us as they hawked insects from the air. Their plumage, much duller than that of the
adults, allowed them to melt into the foliage of the tree they sat in.

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We walked a little further, expecting them to fly off to a distance…but they did not. All of us had goofy smiles on our faces as they flew about our heads, and landed on twigs quite close to us!

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Here’s a full-frame shot of one of them.

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If only all birds,and indeed, all wild creatures, could be (safely)thus free of the fear of humans…well, for a little while, we were in that Utopia!

Just when we thought of turning back, a nice “zebra-backed” Hoopoe, foraging along the ground,

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kept us there for a while longer…

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Reluctantly, we turned back on the path, heading back towards the chores and commitments that awaited us back home.

The wildflowers were lovely too. The Water Hyacinth, an ornamental which is now choking up our waterways as an invasive pest, still has lovely flowers:

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The Cleome had begun to blossom:

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Commelina flowers made bright sparkles underfoot.

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But the scenes. of the cloudy, cool morning on the reservoir will surely be in our mind’s eyes, recharging our souls and getting us through the stresses and strains of our mundane weekdays…We wished every devout Muslim citizen Id Mubarak, as we went home.

Oh…the food? Since we were in a rush, we did not stop for the usual post-trip brefus, but we did have fun eating Padma’s sandwiches, and some of the sweets I’d brought from the wedding I attended on Sunday.

The eBird list (and an impressive one it is, too, for a “summer” outing!) is

here

and I’ve put up my photographs of the trip on an FB album

here

Birders:

Akhilesh
Padma/Ramaswamy
Prasanna
Sudha (from NOIDA)
and I

Butterflies:

Awl, Common Banded
Blues, various (the experts are still disagreeing over the up-wing photos of some of those I clicked, so I will stop with that, instead of going into Gram, Grass, Pea and so on!)
Baronet
Cerulean, Common
Coster, Tawny
Cupid, Plains
Emigrant, Common
Emigrant, Mottled
Forget-me-not
Gull, Common
Jezebel, Common
Leopard, Common
Lime,Common
Mormon, Common
Pansy, Blue
Pansy, Chocolate
Pansy, Lemon
Pioneer
Rose, Common
Rose, Crimson
Sunbeam, Indian
Skipper, Indian
Tiger, Plain
Yellow, Common Grass
Yellow, Three-spot Grass

Already looking forward to the next weekend and what it may bring,

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Gulakmale and Thotti Kallu (T K) Falls, 280517

May 29, 2017

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Sivakumar Mallya, Sudha Iyengar, Janhvi Vyas, Aadya Umesh, Suma Seshadri, Kavitha Umesh, Jayashree Govindarajan, Rishov Biswas, Ramaswamy G S, Padma Ramaswamy, and I, went to visit Gulakmale kere (lake) and T K Falls.

Because of the heavy rain,we started in cool, cloudy and misty weather. Here is the Champakadhama temple at Bannerghatta…an old temple that appears to be lost in the mists of time.

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The mist was everywhere.

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We first stopped at the small pond near the path to the Bhavani temple:

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Having spotted some Baya Weavers,

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We moved to Gulakmale kere,

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where we watched a colony of these birds on a date palm.

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Aadya faithfully documented all that she saw, and as usual, sketched, too. Here’s her sketch of the Baya Weavers’ nest:

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Even as they built their dwellings, a White-rumped Munia arrived to try and occupy them.

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Nature, as a teacher, gave me a geometry lesson.

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The sky slowly cleared

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We then went to T K Falls, where the water had been released due to heavy rain over the Suvarnamukhi river, resulting in a beautiful cascade:

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I took a video of the scene a little further downstream where we crossed to the Muniswara temple area:

Wildflowers were everywhere.

Cleome monophylla, Spindle Pod

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Tarenna asiatica, Asiatic Tarenna:

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Chinese lanter tree

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Hibiscus lobatus (very tiny)

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Grewia damine

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Cadaba fruticosa – Indian Cadaba

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I found a very good website to identify wildflowers,

here

There were plenty of birds, like the

Ashy Prinia on the Marsh Glory

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Cinereous Tit

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Coppersmith Barbets

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Purple-rumped Sunbird

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Southern Coucal

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Many butterflies delighted us.

Crimson Tip

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White Orange-tip

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Blue Tiger

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Plain Tiger on Stachytarpeta

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Common Crow

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Here are three pathologists, one senior banker and one Jobless Person:

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On the way back this beautiful Brahma bull (even though a little emaciated) looked majestic.

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Here we all are, about to tuck into brefus at Udupi Banashree on Bannerghatta Road

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Gulakmale bird list:

here

T K Falls

here

Butterfly list

Blues, various
Cerulean, Common
Crimson Tip
Crow, Common
Cupid, Plains
Emigrant, Common
Emigrant, Mottled
Gull, Common
Jezebel, Common
Leopard, Common
Orange-tip, White
Pansy, Lemon
Rose, Common
Rose, Crimson
Tiger, Blue
Tiger, Plain
Tiger, Striped
Yellow, Common Grass
Yellow, Spotless
Yellow, Three-Spot Grass

FB album

here

Record sighting of Demoiselle Crane, Hulimangala kere, 131215

December 15, 2015

At the last minute, on Sunday morning, I convinced 20 other birders that instead of going to Valley School, we should bird along the Kaggalipura-Bannerghatta stretch, and then go to check out Hulimangala. And there, at nearly the end of a long birding outing, we saw a migrant which has never before been sighted in the Bangalore area…the

Demoiselle Crane

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Can you spot the Crane in its habitat?

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Here it is:

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Here’s the video of its foraging and preening behaviour, which I took on 181215:

Demoiselle cranes undertake one of the toughest migrations in the world….as tough as that of the

Bar-headed Geese

From late August through September, they gather in flocks of up to 400 individuals and prepare for their flight to their winter range. During their migratory flight south, demoiselles fly like all cranes, with their head and neck straight forward and their feet and legs straight behind, reaching altitudes of 16,000-26,000 feet (4,875-7,925 m). Along their arduous journey they have to cross the Himalayan mountains to get to their over-wintering grounds in India. Many die from fatigue, hunger and predation from golden eagles.

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The demoiselle crane is known as the Koonj (कूंज, کونج, ਕੂੰਜ) in the languages of North India, and figure prominently in the literature, poetry and idiom of the region. Beautiful women are often compared to the koonj because its long and thin shape is considered graceful. Metaphorical references are also often made to the koonj for people who have ventured far from home or undertaken hazardous journeys.

In Khichan, Rajasthan in India, villagers feed the cranes on their migration and these large congregations have become an annual spectacle.

The name koonj is derived from the Sanskrit word kraunch, which is a cognate Indo-European term for crane itself, In the mythology of Valmiki, the composer of the Hindu epic Ramayana, it is claimed that his first verse was inspired by the sight of a hunter kill the male of a pair of Demoiselle Cranes that were courting. Observing the lovelorn female circling and crying in grief, he cursed the hunter in verse. Since tradition held that all poetry prior to this moment had been revealed rather than created by man, this verse concerning the Demoiselle Cranes is regarded as the first human-composed meter.

How does the English name of the Crane come about?

Queen Marie Antoinette of France gave the demoiselle crane its name. Demoiselle means maiden, or young lady, in French (one is more familiar with “mademoiselle”). The queen was enchanted by the crane’s delicate and maidenly appearance.

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Here’s the response from N S Prashanth (“Daktre”) who is very knowledgeable on the subject:

“Nice record Deepa! I see that the most recent southern Karnataka record is by Shivaprakash from Kollegal (south-west of Bangalore). He includes the following interesting notes on its previous rare sightings in and around Mysore as comments in his record (see linked checklist). He too has sighted a solitary bird amid Black-headed Ibis. Thought you may find this useful.
“These have been recorded at Yelandur & Nanajangudu (nearby area) reported by Phythian-Adams (1940), Asian Mid-winter waterfowl census 23.1.1992 at Maddur Kere near the place where earlier recorded by VIjayalaxmi Rao, Guruprasad P & others and on 28.01.2001 in KRS backwaters by Shivaprakash A, Ramesh S & Mohankumar M.
References:
Phythian-Adams, E. G. 1940. Small game-shooting in Mysore. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 41: 594-603
Shivaprakash, A. 2002a. Re-occurrence of Demoiselle Crane in Mysore district. Newsletter for Birdwatchers: 42(1):8”

And he also gives the reference list on eBird,

here

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Here’s the factsheet for this bird:
Class AVES
Order GRUIFORMES
Suborder GRUES
Family GRUIDAE
Name (Scientific)Grus virgo
Name (English) Demoiselle crane
Name (French) Grue demoiselle
Hindi: Karkara, Koonj

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Here is a beautiful video (link provided by David d’Costa), showing how these birds migrate at such incredible heights, crossing the snowy peaks:

Here’s Prem Prakash Garg’s video of what I think is the male, taken the next day (14 Dec 2015)

I have since got information that there are at least two individuals on the lake. But here’s the first one sighted!

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Hoskote Kere (Lake),071214

December 10, 2014

Since Snehasis could not join our group for Skandagiri on the 6th, I wanted to take him to a birding spot that he had not visited before.

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As I went down the stairs, I saw this dead

BAMBOO TREE BROWN

dead on the landing, and photographed it:

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I then dropped it respectfully in the mud of a pot downstairs, little knowing that Rohit Girotra would want me to hunt for it the next day, as he wanted a dead butterfly for his collection, and didn’t want to kill one like many others did. Alas, I could not find it!

Snehasis, Ruma and little Soham picked me up, and we headed out to Hoskote Lake.

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In a residential layout close to the lake, we began our birding with this

PADDYFIELD PIPIT:

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We came to the lake, and I found this raptor hiding in the reeds, and looking down into the water to see if it could get some breakfast…either fish or waterfowl.

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I have not seen this behaviour by raptors before! I thought that they soar on thermals, and swoop down on prey that they spot from above.

Egrets were there in plenty…

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and here’s one!

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It was an attractive “waterfowl”scape:

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BRAHMINY KITES

(this one’s a juvenile) flew around, perched,

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preyed, and ate.

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Hungry Bird!

A lone

SPOT-BILLED PELICAN

was perhaps all that was left from many more earlier in the season.

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We were also fortunate enough to meet several other birders, some of whom I knew, some of whom I was meeting face-to-face for the first time.

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I was as thrilled with the quite common

BLACK DRONGO

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as I was with a not-frequent sighting of the

INDIAN SPOTTED EAGLE:

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Ok,that merits one more photo, you can see the nictitating membrane in the bird’s eye, here:

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While we looked at the bird, the bird looked at us!

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I wandered along the bank of the kere,looking for other birds, and this Warbler played hide-and-seek with me!

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Even when I got it, it refused to look at me.

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Then I caught it…this is not a stretch of the imagination!

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and finally, after twenty minutes of patient tracking…

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Meanwhile, a

RED-VENTED BULBUL

was making a shake-and-stake meal of a grasshopper:

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Unexpectedly, along the reeds of the kere, I saw several

RED AVADAVATS (this one is a female)

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We saw all three frequently-seen Kingfishers. The

WHITE-THROATED KINGFISHER

had decided to go to pot!

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The

COMMON KINGFISHER

(which I call the Small Blue, it’s no longer as common as it was)

was a sapphire treasure:

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(I didn’t get any of the Pied Kingfisher)

These

RED-WHISKERED BULBULS

rocked the scene:

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A

COMMON SANDPIPER

foraged in the shallows:

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GREAT CORMORANTS

did their diving antics for food.

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One

RED-RUMPED SWALLOW

was pestering its parent for food, though it seemed quite grown-up to me!

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They were a beautiful study in “back and front”!

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As we left, a

JERDON’S BUSHLARK

sang us a goodbye song…

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a

BROWN SHRIKE

seemed to wink at us, too.

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and a

BLACK KITE

in a Neem tree flew off.

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Ruma took Soham back to the car when he got peckish. He was an enthusiastic birder, and knows
many of the birds’ names!

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A stand of Datura (the fruit is very poisonous, and yet it is grown as an ornamental in the US!) looked beautiful.

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I watched some ants herding

PLANT HOPPERS

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How often does one find one’s name graven in stone (well, cement,at least!)?

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We visited Debashis Das and his wife on the way home, and in their 8th floor balcony, some

SCALY-BREASTED MUNIAS

were nesting!

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This was a real thrill for me, how I wish I could have birds nesting in my home!

Finally, we turned our back on the birds, and came home to breakfast.

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They turned their back on us, too…and a beautiful sight they make, from any angle!

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More photos on my FB album,

here

On the surface, and under it

October 31, 2014

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Seems to me
That our lives
Are like streams.
Across the surface, bright, and shiny,
Float the colourful leaves,
Adding bits of beauty.
But it’s what’s underneath
That makes our lives what they are:
The colours of the fishes, dimly glimpsed
As they move with the currents of our thoughts
And shape our ideas, our responses, and our days.
When the water of our life-streams is clear,
Life is happy.
Muddied and murky waters
Cause us trouble, and worry.
I wish all of us could always have
Pretty streams of consciousness.
But happiness, serenity, illness and rough water
Randomly fall to our lots, sometimes.

Roxen Lake, Linkoping, Sweden, 290714

August 3, 2014

Lake Roxen

is one of the beautiful attractions in the Swedish town of Linkoping, and since I’d borrowed a small folding bike, and I decided to cycle down (we’d walked to the lake previously.)

The weather was very unusually warm even for Swedish summer, but I manfully (womanfully?) pedalled my two tiny wheels, and we started with this beautiful rainbow (though I couldn’t see any rain clouds!)

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We cycled through brown grass and green:

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We came to the place where the road to the lake branched off from the highway:

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A fleecy dolphin floated overhead:

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We explored a place where there was massive earth-moving and construction going on; Barn Swallows were swooping around, taking mud for their nests.

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Here’s my cycle, and the earthmover!

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Wildflowers bloomed everywhere:

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this is wild dill:

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Taking a rough path instead of the road, we found it very enjoyable:

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A

COMMON TORTOISESHELL

sat with its wings closed:

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So did another butterfly:

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There were several

EUROPEAN GREENFINCHES around,

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feeding on the berries:

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A

COMMON KESTREL

delighted me, high overhead:

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Roly-poly, curly-woolly sheep grazed on the farmland:

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Horses rubbed against each other, companionably:

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the golden wheat was nearly ready for harvesting:

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I could spot the lake:

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We rode up to the water:

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A beautifully-flowering acquatic plant welcomed us.

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As did a sitting

ARCTIC TERN

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and several ducks:

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The houses on the lake were picture-perfect:

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The sun in the trees and the reeds was beautiful.

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I was thrilled to spot a

MUTE SWAN

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The swan moved in front of the resting GULLS:

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It was quite far away, but my zoom came in handy:

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then I sawa whole family, with parents and three cygnets:

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This Swan family was one of the highlights, indeed, of my visit to Scandinavia.

Then came the sight of this

GREAT CRESTED GREBE

that I have seen before only in the lap of the Himalaya!

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We discovered even more when we came back to the area the next day…but that’s the next post!

The weather in Sweden

July 28, 2014

I was a bit worried about the weather when I was packing for Sweden and other Scandinavian countries. My friend, who lived in Sweden for many years, told me, “Sweden has two seasons: July/August, and winter.”

After all, I had this 23-kg limitation, and I couldn’t take too much warm clothing.So I packed one light jacket, a couple of shawls and scarves, and one ear-covering cap. I wore the heavier jacket on the flight.

But.

I didn’t realize egg-jackly what my friend said when she mentioned “July/August.”.

The temperature for the past several days has been 31 deg C (that’s 84 deg F) and a humidity varying between 75 ad 97 (I kid you not) per cent. I’ve been using a small, one-speed, folding bike with tiny tyres to get around, and believe me, one feels every degree of the heat and every per cent of the humidity when one is trying to crest the Himalayas (er, they feel like them) in the noonday heat.

Another fact I have learnt. These buildings (in one of which I am staying) have heaters, which are switched on in winter. But they have NO air-conditioning in summer, because probably they don’t HAVE summer. And forget fans.

Forget fans? When every muggy night, as I lie bathed in sweat, all I can think of is switching on the fan in my Bangalore bedroom and going peacefully to sleep? When I went to a couple of stores nearby, I did find pedestal and table fans for sale. But not wanting to put my friend to unnecessary expense, and adding to the junkola accumulation (I am here for aother week!) I didn’t feel like buying one.

I went to Denmark, and standing in the sun to watch the Changing of the Guard,in Copenhagen, I got blistered AND fried at the same time. Never has an ice-cream tasted as good as the one I got on the pier. I wanted to have another one to put down my perspiring back….Well, we got back to Sweden after some more travels which were, lucikly, not too bad. Once again, the temperature soared. cycled to and from work like a trooper.

But…by yesterday (Sunday) , both of us had had enough. “Let’s go fly a kite!” I yodelled. My friend looked at me in surprise. “Sorry! That’s a famous song from ‘Mary Poppins’,” I explained, I wanted to use the tune to sing, “Let’s go… buy a fan!” So off we went. Cycled off in the muggy heat, with Old Sol beating down on our helmeted heads as fiercely as he could, as if to make up for all the snowy, sleety, frosty, rainy mornings when he’d gone off to get some chai and left all the Scandinavians in the lurch.

We went to five stores. Why did we do that? Were we very choosy about the models of the fans and the colours we wanted (the fans we’d seen the previous week were all the reverse of Mr Ford and his model-T story…they were all white.) Oh, no! There was a simple reason why we went to store after store after store after store….there were NO fans!

Stores do change their layouts often, the better to trap the customer with more unplanned purchases, so initially, we thought they’d put the fans Somewhere Else. But when we finally located a store employee in Store no.1, we realized that the Else where they had put the Somewhere was…in Other Customers’ Homes! All the fans were sold out.

Having, ofkose, chosen the hottest part of the day (from 11am onwards) to do the FBE (Fan Buying Expedition), we went to Store no. 2. Then Store no. 3. Then Store no. 4. Puff-puff, pant-pant. Pedal-pedal-pedal. Puddle-puddle-puddle (of sweat.) Sweat trickling down along my ears, along my back, moistening the waistband of my trousers. I suggested to my friend in Store no. 4 that we just climb into one of the display camping tents and stay in the store for a couple of days. He wouldn’t listen, law-abiding nutcase that he is.

I made a Wise Prediction. Murphy’s Law mandated that we would find a fan, probably beat-up and not working, in Store no. 5. I was wrong, as usual. “Zere is a vairee few flaktar (fans),” the Pretty-Young-Thing-Who-Looked-Like-A-Nordic-Wax-Doll at the entrance told us. There WERE fans. They were NOT beat-up old ones, but new. There were actually three models. But…..

One looked like the head of a Storm Trooper from Star Wars. Another one was so small I had to close one eye to be able to see it inside its small metal cage. The third one had no wire or metal mesh at all. In each case, when I put my face about 3 inches from the revolving blades, I felt a faint stirring of a gentle zephyr. The beads of perspiration on my face laughed nastily, and rolled down a bit more victoriously. No wonder the third fan had no grille…it didn’t need one! All I needed to do was to put my pinky finger gently on one of the teensy-weensy plastic blades, and the fan stopped, timorous and worried, and eager to stop.

I had just finished a blistering summer in Bangalore, and come to Sweden. I knew that from here I would be going to St.Louis in August…triple-H…Hot, Humid, and Horrible. So I was very happy to be going to Sweden and Denmark and the rest of Scandinavia, where the nip in the air would be very welcome.

Nip? Even the BUSES are not air-conditioned in the summer, they are only heated in the winter!…and remember..there are no water fountains…one has to BUY water, expensive Swedish Kroner water, everywhere!

Nip? The only nip I want to do is to NIP the rest of this trip and fly off to St.Louis, where at least everyone knows what summer is, and there is blessed air-conditioning, and my poor daughter bought me a table fan last year….

One thing you can say is very true…I am NOT a fan of the Swedish summer!

News about The Boods, STL

April 8, 2014

On the 31st of March, the siblings had water fun:

a bda bdi bath 310314 STL

On the 6th of April, they went to a friend’s Minnie-Mouse-theme party:

boodi with Minnie Mouse, STL, 060414

bdi bday pty 060414

A little more, and he won’t be a cutie, he’ll be an electrocutie:

booda elec 060414

I’ll be going to visit them in the not-too-distant future!

Hosakote kere, Karnataka, 230213

February 23, 2014

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Kamal pinged me past 10pm yesterday…and off we went,early this morning, to Hosakote Kere, with Vasuki, and having picked up Binu on the way, too.

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At the MCS (Mandatory Chai Stop).

We stopped at the bund of Hosakote Kere, with the sun still low in the eastern horizon, silhouetting the swallows…

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A

BLACK-WINGED KITE

sub-adult seemed to have wings of black…and silver…

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There were already other photographers at the kere:

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And we joined them:

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The marshy area of the kere was aglow with green algae:

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I followed some PLAIN PRINIAS through the bushes:

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Several WOOD SANDPIPERS waded around:

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It seemed as if this GREATER CORMORANT was lifting its wings in benison:

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PHEASANT-TAILED JACANAS strutted their paisley shapes about:

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a vee-formation of Cormorants went past:

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At full zoom, my camera caught these two SILVERBILLS on a little pot!

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A GREY-BELLLIED CUCKOO delighted us very briefly:

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A GLOSSY IBIS sat in the reeds

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All of a sudden, a huge flock of ducks appeared in the sky, wheeled around, and came to settle in the waters of the kere. We watched, spellbound:

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Two SPOT-BILLED PELICANS landed, and floated lightly about:

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BLACK-WINGED STILTS were in plenty:

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It was a stunning sight when at some mysterious signal they all took off:

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There were many LITTLE GREBES:

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A great sighting today by Kamal was of the

GREAT REED WARBLER

in the reeds of the lake. Alas, he could not get a shot.

There were many fishermen on the kere, in plastic coracles (though I saw the traditional bamboo ones on the bank, too.)

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The trishool of the Gangamma temple was decorated:

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The temple is the Om of the Goddess!

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You can see Shiva sitting with Parvati, with Ganga on his head:

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Everywhere, TENT SPIDERS had spun a mist:

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We took a breakfast break, and went to Sri Krishna Upahar on the main highway:

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On the bund, a borewell was being dug, and rice and freshly-caught fish were ready for cooking:

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Birds:

Babbler, Jungle
Bee-eater, Small Green
Bulbul, Red-vented
Bushchat, Pied
Bushlark, Jerdon’s
Coot, Common
Cormorant, Great
Cormorant,Little
Coucal, Greater
Crow, House
Crow, Jungle
Cuckoo, Grey-bellied
Dove, Laughing
Dove, Spotted
Drongo, Black
Duck, Spot-billed
Egret, Cattle
Egret, Great
Egret, Intermediate
Egret, Little
Flowerpecker, Pale-billed
Francolin, Grey
Garganey
Grebe, LIttle
Harrier, Eurasian Marsh
Heron, Grey
Heron, Indian Pond
Heron, Purple
Ibis, Glossy
Jacana, Pheasant-tailed
Kite, Black
Kite, Black-winged
Kite, Bramhiny
Koel, Asian
Lapwing, Red-wattled
Lark, Ashy-crowned Sparrow
Moorhen, Common
Moorhen, Purple
Myna, Common
Myna, Jungle
Oriole, Eurasian Golden
Parakeet, Rose-ringed
Pelican, Spot-billed
Pigeon, Blue Rock
Pipit, Paddyfield
Prinia, Ashy
Prinia, Plain
Robin, Indian
Roller, Indian
Sandpiper, Green
Sandpiper, Wood
Silverbill, Indian
Sparrow, House
Starling,Rosy
Stilt, Black-winged
Sunbird, Purple
Sunbird, Purple-rumped
Swallow, Barn
Swallow, Red-rumped
Swallow, Wire-tailed
Swift, Asian Palm
Tailorbird, Common
Wagtail, White-browed
Wagtail, Yellow
Warbler, Blyth’s Reed
Warbler, Booted
Warbler, Clamorous Reed
Warbler, Great Reed

Sorry, didn’t keep track of butterfies today. Was somehow tired and a little sleepy, off my form!

Photos on my FB album,

click here

I took two short videos; one, of a shimmering black line of Swallows, and a white line of Egrets:

Another of a flight of ducks, swirling over the lake, not landing but wheeling around:

Let me close with a pic of this bAginA (offering) that someone had made. A baagina usually contains a packet of arshina (turmeric), kumkum, black bangles, black beads (used in the mangalsutra), a comb, a small mirror, baLe bicchoLe, coconut, blouse piece, dhaanya (cereal), rice, toor dal, green dal, wheat or rava and jaggery cut in a cube form. The baagina is offered in a traditional mora (winnow painted with turmeric).

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