Posts Tagged ‘walk’

My walk home: vehicles

November 15, 2018

The walk home from my daughter’s, in terms of vehicles:
Cars, being washed, causing rivulets of water.
Scooters and mopeds, with helmeted and helmetless riders, the latter trusting to their luck to get away without being fined…or receiving head injuries in an accident.
The occasional cycle, ridden by spandex-clad, eye-shaded men (I rarely see women on cycles, even now) or men with lungis at half-mast.
Conservancy vehicles, with garbage being thrown into their noisome innards.
Autos speeding past with passengers, or refusing to take them.
School buses and vans threading their way through narrow side roads.
Cars carefully covered with tarpaulin.Pushcarts with various wares: fruits, vegetables, flowers, knick-knacks, ears of corn.
A tow vehicle, out early, looking for wrongly parked vehichles to pull away.
An excavator and a road roller, rumbling past.
A peculiar vehicle that my daughter calls a leper skateboard, with a beggar on it, bandaged hands outstretched in supplication.
BMTC buses trying to negotiate dug-up roads and chaotic crossings.
All this explains why our traffic problems are very complex!

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More walks…

October 30, 2018

My walk to Ranga Shankara, in terms of smells.
The ground coffee from the darshini.
The heady aroma of the Akasha Mallige.
Frying onions from an unknown source.
Agarbathi or dhoop fragrance from a nearby window.
A waft of strong perfume from a lady whizzing by on the back of a scooter.
Punctuating all these, and vitiating them, the stench of accumulations of garbage.
My city is a nasal smorgasbord.

This morning’s walk from my daughter’s to my home, in terms of fruits…
The ubiquitous bananas everywhere, punctuated by guavas and pomegranates on both carts and small trees, the not-usual-at-this-time grapes, a small pomelo tree,bael fruit hanging from a tree in someone’s garden, papayas on a tree in an empty lot, lemons hanging over the footpath. The seed pods of honge, sampige swaying in the breeze. And let me not forget the coconuts in the front garden of a house which, instead of a name, bears the inscription, “Beware of falling coconuts.”

My walk home from my daughter’s, in terms of sounds: the burbling, liquid sound of the Red-whiskered Bulbul and a couple of Tailorbirds, then the harsh cawing of crows. The rasping of two coconut brooms that a pourakramika uses to clean leaf litter and trash. The clank of the bucket and mug, that maid wields to wash the pavement in the front of the house.The echoing call of “soppu!” from a pushcart vendor. Cars, two-wheelers and the whine of autos as I cross the main road. Snatches of conversation as I pass people, some of it very intriguing. The monsoon wind soughing through the branches of a large Gulmohar tree. The Venkatesha Suprabhatam from the phone of one walker who has apparently not heard of earphones. The “ha-ha-ha” of the Laughter Club. The honking horns of impatient motorists rushing to work. Mukesh’s “chal ri sajni” from an open window. A program on Ambabai, on Amurthavarshini channel, in my own ears. My own footsteps as I climb the four floors, and the key in my front door…

July 8:

Today’s walk home, from my daughter’s, in terms of flowers:
The dragonfruit flower, also called Brahmakamalam locally, budding in many flowerpots.
Copper pod flowers finishing up their bursts of yellow.
Violin-leaf Plumeria smiling from veritcal-looking plants.
Cape Jasmine flowers starring the ground.
A lady picking up Coral Jasmine flowers from the granite slabs in front of her home, to add to the hibiscus in her basket.
Manoranjitham flowering too high for me to try smelling it.
Carts with marigold garlands, and button roses.
Several colours of bougainvillea, and here and there, jasmine flowers nodding their heads in the morning breeze.
This is not the season of purple (Jacaranda) ,red (Gulmohar) or yellow (Copper pod) carpets, but I still enjoy the flowers as I walk!
The most beautiful flowers, ofkose, were the two I put on the school bus before starting to walk home.

May 14

This morning’s walk to my daughter’s home. The fragrance of “sampige” (champa, shenbagam, Michela champaca, call it what you will) flowers wafting down from the trees. Women with their sarees hiked up past their ankles which have silver anklets, dotting the wet ground preparatory to making the rangolis. Little tea stalls doing brisk business. Newspapers being thrown into gardens. A conversation I do not hear, but only the word “thEvadiyA” (whore) repeated, loudly, and with great emphasis, by an elderly woman to the man in front of her. (What a beginning to her morning, I think.) A cat walking nonchalantly across the broken glass on a wall. Pourakramikas collecting and emptying trash, keeping our city livable. A new vegetable shop, advertising “holsel rate”. The pushcarts, selling various things, moving the small-business economy of the city. I walk through my world, feeling lucky and happy.

My walk home, 311018

October 30, 2018

My walk home this morning from my daughter’s, in terms of sunlight:
Making interesting moving shadows of leaves on the road.
Backlighting the hibiscus flowers into glowing gems.
Outlining a young man’s crewcut in sharp bristles.
Touching a young girl’s hair with gold as she turns to wave goodbye to her mother.
Dappling through palm fronds.
Reflecting in a blinding flash off some fragments of broken glass.
Dancing through the motes of the dust particles raised by a pourakramika sweeping the footpath. Slanting in shafts though the holes in some brickwork.
Warming up the slight nip in the air, and making it delightful to walk home!

4th Sunday outing, Bngbirds: Muthanallur Kere, 220718

July 25, 2018

Our group, the Usual Gang of Suspects, at MCS or Mandatory Chai Stop. The group always has different people, so this is a good way of introducing ourselves to each other!

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The assembled group except for MBK.

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Anil, Anindita, Divya, Regin, Arpita,Sushma, Imtiaz (hidden),Siri, Sanjay, Suhasini, Padma,Prathap, Ramaswamy, Gopinath, Raju, Harish, Ganesha, Priyaranjan, Subramanya, Sahas, Vijay, Arnab, Srini, Deepak. MBK is missing. Muthanallur lake,220718

With MBK, who was photographing me photographing the group!

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Email to bngbirds egroup:

Dear Shyam, Sorry that you had to miss a very pleasant morning, and one where two of the most experienced birders of Bangalore were present! It was very nice to have Dr M B Krishna and Dr S Subramanya, who shared some of their encyclopaedic knowledge with us.

Suhasini with MBK and Subbu

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All of us met at the Shani temple at Muthanallur,

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but when we started walking on the lake bund, it was apparent that because of the proliferation of water hyacinth, this part of the lake was completely choked and we could not see much. So we all piled into our cars and went to the Muthanallur bus stop, and from there to the path that leads past a pig farm to the shore of the lake.

Rose-ringed Parakeet

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The lake was brimming; this is, surely, the fullest that I have seen this waterbody.

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The path that we usually walked on was completely under water, so we took the higher path. This, too, was very overgrown after the rains, and we did not cover more than half the distance we usually cover in drier seasons. However enough interesting beings kept us occupied.

Pied Kingfisher

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Having started with Coppersmith Barbets and White-throated Kingfishers near the temple, we looked at Little Grebes, Little and Great Cormorants, Coots and an occasional Egret and Pond Heron. Black Kites and Brahminy Kites soared over the water, effortlessly riding on the monsoon wind. We heard the Common Iora before some of us spotted it. Some Purple Swamphens, Common Moorhens, and an Indian Cormorant added to our list. We watched Sunbirds and Flowerpeckers, too.

Sunbird’s nest

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Oriental Darter

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Nor was there a lack of other creatures to observe. Today certainly seemed to be Spider Day! Wood Spiders, Orb Weavers, Tent Spiders, Signature Spiders, Comb-footed Spiders, Social Spiders…what a variety of them we were privileged to see this morning!

Butterflies, dragonflies, and damselflies, too, dotted our walk and it was nice to see ants farming hoppers on the Milkweed plants. Siri was the only child on the walk, but she was most interested in everything, even though a snail shell had her drawing back in disgust!

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Green Lynx Spider with fly kill.

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A variety of wild plants were all around us. I showed them the Abutilon, the Devil’s Coach Whip, the Coat Button flowers, and the heart-shaped mark on the seeds of the Balloon Vine, that gives it the scientific name “cardiospermum” (cardio=heart, spermum=seed).Evolvulus, Justicia, Richardia, Senna, bloomed everywhere.The water hyacinth led the list of invasive plants, with Parthenium, Lantana, Eupatorium there too. We looked at the monocultures of Acacia and Eucalyptus.

Returning, we paused at the Adi Parasakhti temple that has been recently built, next to the huge old Mahua tree, which was fruiting.

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MBK aaked an intriguing question about why the tree dropped all its seeds near itself rather than trying to disperse it far and wide. (Want to know the answer? Email him!) We shared the variety of snacks that we brought, and having restored our tissues, walked back to our waiting commitments elsewhere and the routine of our weekday lives.

Some of us stopped for breakfast at South Inn, on Sarjapura Road, as we returned that way.

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Replete, and charged up with the easy companionship of a morning spent in Nature, we wended our way homewards.

Many thanks to Deepak, who came along in spite of running a fever the previous day. As one of us had locked the key inside the car, he stayed until the issue was sorted out (Gautam went to the village and got a mechanic from a garage, who opened the car in a few minutes!), before leaving.

Small Salmon Arab.

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MBK made the point that the walk must start later to allow students to join in. However, on my own walks, I ensure that college students and young women are provided safe transportation, and have many of them on walks that start sharp at 6.30am. It just takes a little extra effort to accommodate people in cars; and it results in everyone meeting new people and bonds the group together!

So please, if you have any difficulty with transportation on the 3rd and 4th Sunday walks, do ask on the group if someone is coming from your area; people are generally happy to share a ride, and people like me, who do not have a car, or have trouble with the low frequency and late start of public transport on a Sunday, can still enjoy these outings.

I have put up an album of my photos on FB,

here

and on Flickr,

here

I have taken a short video of the group while we took a snack break:

Shyam and others, wishing you a good time for the rest of the Sunday, (I mean the siesta as well as the time left!) and a productive week ahead.

Cheers, Deepa.

Walk home, 310118

January 31, 2018

My walk home this morning.

Newspapers flying through the air to land in sometimes wet front driveways. Vegetable vendors offloading from autorickshaws. Sunlight slanting in motes of dust, through the branches of trees. The still-lingering nip in the air that makes me–almost– forget that I am still limping, 9 weeks after the knee surgery.

Steaming, tiny cups of chai and kaapi at various corners. Rangolis that are much smaller than they were last month. A little boy reluctant to get off his mother’s two-wheeler, at his school. Beans more tender than a child’s finger, and a cauliflower with a caterpillar smiling up at me…that makes me decide to buy them (no pesticides!) Smiling at several people whom I don’t know but see regularly.

I arrive home, feeling peaceful and happy. Surely, this is a perfect life.

Nature walk for Munchkins Montessori, Puttenahalli kere, 151217

December 15, 2017

Letter to Chanda of Munchkins:

Hi Chanda,

The walk went very well. It was very nice to meet Priti, Mythili, Anna and others.

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List of various beings seen:

Birds:

Cormorant, Great

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Cormorant, Little
Egret, Cattle
Egret, Little
Heron, Pond
Kite, Common
Moorhen, Purple
Sunbird, Purple-rumped
Tailorbird, Common
Warbler, Greenish

Butterflies:

Bob, Chestnut
Cerulean, Common
Castor, Common
Emigrant, Common
Jezebel, Common
Lacewing, Common (eggs)
Leopard,Common
Pansy, Lemon

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Lime, Common
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Tiger, Plain
Tiger, Striped
Yellow, Common Grass

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Fishes:
Tilapia

Insects:

Bees
Damselflies
Dragonflies
Spiders
Wasps

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Trees and Plants

Bougainvillea
Badminton Ball
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Date Palm
Fig Tree
Honge
Mahogany
Neem
Pride of India
Sampige
Singapore Cherry

I talked about leaf composting, clearing weeds in the lake, the way birds’ beaks have different shapes, water and woodland birds, differences in leaves and tree bark, and about how much effort it takes to maintain a lake.

When I conduct walks I generally take far fewer photos. I have posted the photos on my FB album

here

Please share this link with the others.

Looking forward to future association with all of you…the children were truly delightful!

Cheers, Deepa

Morning walk, 080717

July 8, 2017

The morning walk, in cool, cloudy weather, is a great joy.

I start by buying the Deccan Herald (the news is always the same, but I love the Saturday cryptic crossword). I walk under the shade of large trees, watching the vegetable, fruits and flower vendors setting up for the morning.

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Joggers, walkers, and others pass me or fall behind. Several people stand on the grass, contorting themselves into good health.

Barbets and Koels welcome the morning as they clear their throats, prior to singing their familiar songs.The screech of a squirrel as the resident Shikra catches it. A snatch of Venkatesha Suprabhatham from someone who has apparently not heard of earphones.

The White-Hair-or-No-Hair brigade sitting in easy companionship, with steaming cups of darshini coffee, and the morning papers. Youngsters employed in call centers leaving, looking bleary-eyed.

I come home, tear off yesterday’s sheet on my Murugan calendar, and give thanks for the new day that lies ahead. And yes, I have filled in a few words in the crossword!

Safety and security, STL, 170814

August 19, 2014

Yesterday I went to

<a href=”http://www.academyofsciencestl.org/calendar/functions/popup.php?ev=2456888&readFile=0&readSQL=1&showCat=&oc=1″&gt; this event </a>

at the St.Louis Zoo auditorium.

I had not read in detail about the extinction of Passenger Pigeons in the US (where a population of several billion birds was wiped out, purely because of human intervention), and it was a revelation to me.

However, I did not want to call on DnA to pick me up from the Zoo auditorium and I walked back. As I did, I mused on safety and security. There was nothing different about my walking back at about 9pm from the Zoo auditorium, across Forest Park, back home, I usually do it during Muny shows, Shakespeare-in-the-Park, or the Royal Philharmonic on Art Hill (it took me about half an hour, you can go to Google maps and look at the St.Louis Zoo, and look for Christ Deliverance Ministry, Enright Ave…you’ll know where I walked) I usually cut across the grass, not always keeping to the roads. I was wondering, yesterday, if walking in the dark was a wise thing to do. Then I told myself that the fears were mostly in my own mind and perception…in fact, it was probably safer now than before the Ferguson incident,
(here’s a video of John Oliver’s take on it:

…actually, with so many police cars on the prowl ! I walked uneventfully back home. (It does help that I am a “black” person, not white, I suppose, in this area!)

So much of our fears are in our own perceptions, coloured by our own prejudices…where should we draw the line between genuine concerns and our own timorousness?

The trouble in the US is the stupid gun culture. I might be walking far away from any know source of trouble, and might get cut down by a stray bullet! Well, at the end of it all, I believe it’s Fate…and I walk briskly, not loitering. And when I’ve got home safely, I like the feeling that I didn’t give in to the feeling of “Oh, what might happen to me!” and just call DnA to leave their hectic chores and come and pick me up!

But IF something had happened, I would have been reviled for my foolhardiness…how to know, in advance, if my fears are well-founded or groundless? No way, alas, but to put it to the test, and walk home!

The Green Heron, Forest Park, 100814

August 11, 2014

It felt good to be out, after a killer few days, walking in Forest Park. I strolled on(thanks to two fractured big toes,and a sprained ankle, my walking is only strolling these days) towards the Prairie area, and the stream.

I was amply rewarded by this

GREEN HERON

fishing in the waters of the stream; I saw it sitting there, in an attentive pose:

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Then, as the fish was sighted,there was this flurry of fishing:

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The fish was well-caught:

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The Wiki entry says the Green Heron, (Butorides virescens), is “is relatively small; adult body length is about 44 cm (17 in). The neck is often pulled in tight against the body. Adults have a glossy, greenish-black cap, a greenish back and wings that are grey-black grading into green or blue, a chestnut neck with a white line down the front, grey underparts and short yellow legs. The bill is dark with a long, sharp point.” Such beautiful colours, named just as a bland “Green”!

“Green Herons are intolerant of other birds when feeding,” says the Wiki, but this Heron I saw was right next to three Mallards, and seemed pretty tolerant of their presence.

One of the amazing facts about these birds, is that “sometimes they drop food, insects, or other small objects on the water’s surface to attract fish, making them one of the few known tool-using species. This feeding method has led some to title the green and closely related Striated Heron as among the world’s most intelligent birds.”

I left this intelligent bird to the rest of its breakfast, and walked to see what other delights Forest Park had for me…and as usual, Forest Park did not disappoint me!

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Midsummer’s Eve, Linkoping, 200614

June 25, 2014

Though I’d asked Prashanth in the morning, he mistook the midsummer’s eve Maypole dancing to be taking place on the next day; at about 4pm, he realized his mistake, and we set off to the place where it was taking place.

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Here’s a video of the dancing that he took last year:

And of the music:

Though the dancing had finished, the maypole was still up:

We saw the Love Pavilion:

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There was a small stream:

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There was a pretty wooden bridge across it:

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Perhaps this gentleman was going over his memories, with that reminiscent smile on his face?

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There were plenty of flowers blooming:

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this Silverpil tree (Salix alba)

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had some beautiful bracket fungi:

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It is the custom on this day to wear crowns of wildflowers:

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But that doesn’t mean one can’t be in touch with modernity!

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The birds were there, too!

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There were some Vikings around:

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Some kind of game with wooden skittles was being played:

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I looked at some pretty old architecture:

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This is the Stora Hotel:

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Here’s coffee… by George!

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I loved this window:

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This one is from 1912!

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With some serpentine touches:

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Some shop windows looked inviting:

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So did this art gallery (it was closed, of course)

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Of course, the Tourist Bureau was closed, too!

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Let me close with this flower (probably a Columbine?)

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we then walked towards the Linkoping Cathedral…but that’s the next post!