Posts Tagged ‘sunset’

Sunset and Sunrise on the Kaveri, 06 and 070115

January 14, 2015

IMG_9031

IMG_9027

IMG_9029

IMG_9036

IMG_9038

IMG_9044

And now for the next morning’s sunrise…

IMG_9066

IMG_9067

IMG_9075

IMG_9076

IMG_9069

Advertisements

Experiments with light, 190914, Forest Park

September 26, 2014

I went and met Danny Brown in Forest Park, and spent a contented morning. There were no new birds, but I was trying out shots in different light settings.

The early morning sunshine was something I had to get from Danny’s running car:

IMG_0943

The rising sun on the Cooper’s Hawk gave me another opportunity to shoot against the sun:

IMG_0980

This, to me, provided more drama than the conventional sunlight-on-the-bird shot.

IMG_0984

There was the light on grass seeds:

IMG_1021

The long shadows, and the arch of the bridge made an interesting composition:

IMG_1034

I thought the sepia generalized the bird and accentuated the lines and curves.

IMG_1042

The mist rising off the water made a good capture.

IMG_1046

Even the common Mallard looked lovely in the golden light.

IMG_1064

I enjoyed the various poses!

IMG_1073

IMG_1072

IMG_1078

IMG_1082

Greenery against the light was lovely, too.

IMG_1066

Then we came across a Wood Duck couple, partially in the light, and partially out of it. This was quite a challenge, getting the birds and their reflections without too much of washout.

IMG_1106

IMG_1112

IMG_1113

Getting details with the zoom was important.

IMG_1114

Of course, Danny clicked away like the pro that he is; it was I who was struggling!

IMG_1116

I got the male Wood Duck alone:

IMG_1118

Getting macro shots against the morning light was also tough.

IMG_1128

Another common bird, the Starling:

IMG_1130

I got a Cormorant in mid-flight:

IMG_1139

IMG_1150

In the twilight, I went again to Forest Park, and got the Great Horned Owls that Mark and Brenda were showing some people:

IMG_1219

IMG_1230

I may not be producing earth-shaking shots, but I’m quite happy with my experiments with light at various times of the day.

Bubbles, 160914

September 18, 2014

We played with bubbles last evening.

IMG_1330

Bubbles in the sunset:

IMG_1331

I blew the bubbles, and Kavya hunted them down:

IMG_1318

Kavya did her share of blowing:

IMG_1298

IMG_1283

Some bubbles rested, ever so delicately, on the grass:

IMG_1282

Some even survived landing on the concrete:

IMG_1289

Mother and son arrived, and he joined in:

IMG_1326

IMG_1333

What can define “delight” better than a child looking at a rainbow bubble?

Walking into the sunset, 250814

August 27, 2014

DSC08281 STL 240814

When, in stories, a person “walks into the sunset”, there are no pages left in the book (except, perhaps, of a listing of other books by the same author, or similar books.) But in real life…life goes on. There may not be any conclusion of the hopes–and fears– that the person carries along…and the next sunrise awaits.

Two kinds of birding…

May 14, 2014

The

Valley School area

is one of the favourite birding destinations in south Bangalore

DSC04211

On two days, I was privileged to do two different kinds of birding there.

One outing, on 110514, started at dawn:

DSC04156

On the 11th, we started from Shoppers’ Stop as a group of 9:

DSC04154

At the MCS, L to R: . Karuna, Janani, Siva, Varun, Aravind, Venkat, Ragini, Janhvi, yours truly, and Ganesh.

As more friends joined us at the Valley, and we met Swethadri and Kamal Hari, the group swelled to 15!

On this outing, we walked the trail, actively looking for birds, such as this

ROSE-RINGED PARAKEET

on the Silver Oak tree:

DSC04157

a

CRESTED SERPENT EAGLE:

DSC04168

the

WHITE-RUMPED SHAMA:

DSC04177

with many birds, we ended with this

HOOPOE

on the path:

DSC04185

Of course, I like to see the trees and plants around, too. I could not id this tree:

DSC04158

The beautiful trunk of a

TAMARIND:

DSC04169

and its tiny flowers:

DSC04171

the beauty of the

GULMOHAR

under which I sat for a while:

DSC04173

the petal of its flower:

DSC04181

Photography was an active pursuit, too. I am not lying, but the photographer is!

DSC04201

Ganesh is carefully documenting an insect…

DSC04167

When one of us got a good shot, the others enjoyed it, too:

DSC04203

There were quite a few butterflies, and I clicked this

DANAID EGGFLY:

DSC04208

Some of us wound up with brefus at

Udupi Banashree

DSC04213

(Yashpal, extreme left, has joined us!)

This active seeking out of the birds is one kind of birding, and on this morning, we were very successful in our quest. We wandered over the bamboo thickets and liana areas, and a variety of bird sightings rewarded us.

On the 13th, it was just Rosita,

DSC04306

her son Mark, who’s an excellent bird-spotter,

DSC04287

and me. This was in the late afternoon and evening…

DSC04299

Once we reached the end of the path where the

ABANDONED HOUSE

DSC04265

(familiar to every birder, I would think, in south Bangalore…I’ll make another blogpost about it. Thanks to Mark, I entered it and looked around for the first time in so many years!)

We just stayed there, not moving very much. The Banyan tree with the last of its figs was a kind of “bird Darshini (eatery)” for birds, so we just watched the birds in, and near, the majestic tree. Later, we walked around the abandoned house.

Mark didn’t even take a minute to see the

SPOTTED OWLET:

DSC04239

DSC04242

The

JUNGLE BABBLERS

kept us company:

DSC04243

This

ASHY PRINIA

its cousin, the Plain Prinia, and the Common Tailorbird, hopped through the undergrowth:

DSC04246

First one

LARGE CUCKOO-SHRIKE

DSC04269

and then two, delighted us:

DSC04280

The

INDIAN LABURNUM

was in flower everywhere:

DSC04284

MISTLETOE

(Loranthus) grew on the nearby tree:

DSC04296

Looking carefully at the adventitious roots of the Banyan showed me

ANTS

farming the aphids:

DSC04258

This

ROCK AGAMA

male, coming into his breeding colours, looked askance at me:

DSC04293

The difference between the two kinds of birding is very marked. One means active walking around, seeking the areas where some birds are likely to be. The other means staying in one place, passively content with whatever birds show themselves. But both are intensely satisfying.

A large group vs. a very small one also makes a big difference to what one sees. In one, the chances of sighting the birds actually increase, if everyone is a careful birder. But a smaller group can be just as good.

With both kind of birding, there is the happiness of learning from others, and being able to share a sighting…sometimes with everyone in the large group

In the “active walking” mode, it’s looking for the birds; in the “passive waiting” mode, it’s about watching the birds that do appear, and soaking in the whole atmosphere.

Morning birding and evening birding, too, have different kinds of light for photography (and sometimes even seeing the birds.)

You can click

here for the visit where 15 of us enjoyed the morning

and

here for the visit with Rosita and Mark

110514 bird list:

Babbler, Jungle
Babbler, Yellow-billed
Barbet, Coppersmith
Barbet, White-cheeked
Bee-eater, Blue-bearded
Bee-eater, Small Green
Bulbul, Red-vented
Bulbul, Red-whiskered
Bulbul, White-browed
Bushchat, Pied
Bushlark, Jerdon’s
Buzzard, Oriental Honey
Coucal, Southern
Crow, House
Crow, Jungle
Cuckoo, Common Hawk (heard)
Cuckoo-shrike, Large
Dove, Laughing
Dove, Spotted
Drongo, Ashy
Drongo, Black
Eagle, Crested Serpent
Egret, Cattle
Egret, Little
Flameback, Black-rumped
Flowerpecker, Pale-billed
Flycatcher, Asian Paradise
Flycatcher, Tickell’s Blue
Flycatcher, White-browed Fantail
Francolin, Grey (heard)
Iora, Common
Junglefowl, Grey (heard)
Kingfisher, White-breasted
Kite, Black
Kite, Brahminy
Koel, Asian
Lapwing, Red-wattled
Leafbird, Golden-fronted
Malkoha, Blue-faced
Minivet, Small
Myna, Common
Myna, Jungle
Oriole, Eurasian Golden
Parakeet, Rose-ringed
Peafowl, Indian (heard)
Pigeon, Blue Rock
Pipit, Paddyfield
Pitta, Indian
Prinia, Ashy
Prinia, Grey-breasted
Quail, un id
Robin, Indian
Robin, Oriental Magpie
Roller, Indian
Shama, White-rumped
Shrike, Long-tailed
Sunbird, Purple-rumped
Swallow, Red-rumped
Tailorbird, Common
Wagtail, White-browed
Warbler, Greenish

130514 bird list:

Babbler, Jungle
Babbler, Yellow-billed
Barbet, Coppersmith
Barbet, White-cheeked
Bee-eater, Blue-bearded
Bee-eater, Small Green
Bulbul, Red-vented
Bulbul, Red-whiskered
Bulbul, White-browed
Bushchat, Pied
Bushlark, Jerdon’s
Buzzard, Oriental Honey
Coucal, Southern
Crow, House
Crow, Jungle
Cuckoo, Common Hawk (heard)
Cuckoo-shrike, Large
Dove, Laughing
Dove, Spotted
Drongo, Ashy
Drongo, Black
Eagle, Short-toed Snake
Egret, Cattle
Egret, Little
Flowerpecker, Pale-billed
Flycatcher, White-browed Fantail
Francolin, Grey (heard)
Junglefowl, Grey (heard)
Kingfisher, White-breasted
Kite, Black
Kite, Brahminy
Koel, Asian
Lapwing, Red-wattled
Leafbird, Golden-fronted
Malkoha, Blue-faced
Myna, Common
Myna, Jungle
Owl, Mottled Wood
Owlet, Spotted
Parakeet, Rose-ringed
Peafowl, Indian (heard)
Pigeon, Blue Rock
Pipit, Paddyfield
Prinia, Ashy
Robin, Indian
Robin, Oriental Magpie
Roller, Indian
Shrike, Long-tailed
Sunbird, Purple-rumped
Swallow, Red-rumped
Tailorbird, Common

Sunset, Fire, and Outer Space, 050414

April 8, 2014

As we waited for dusk, so that the Slender Lorises would become active, we were treated to the sight of a beautiful sunset.

DSC01790

DSC01792

DSC01812

However, as the sun sank, I watched a villager set fire to the edges of his field:

DSC01820

DSC01825

When I asked him, he said he was burning the Lantana bushes.

DSC01829

I am still not sure why he had to burn them, but the sun and the flames seemed to compete.

DSC01834

It seemed that, along with the fires, the whole sky was aflame:

DSC01839

I watched the fires rage…

DSC01821

I walked away, down the trail, and watched the moon and stars come into their own:

DSC01848

Lovely to see out into space, while waiting to see something in our little world!

Sunset, Bilekkal Temple, Sundaghatta (Kanakapura) Karnataka, 280214

March 2, 2014

I was with my friends, at the edge of the valley:

DSC09745

DSC09754

DSC09753

DSC09752

DSC09751

February sank in a blaze of wonder.

DSC09733

DSC09736

DSC09740

DSC09763

DSC09764

DSC09762

DSC09765

DSC09769

DSC09774

DSC09773

DSC09774

The Bilekkal Temple, Sundaghatta, Karnataka, 280214

March 2, 2014

I went with N C Mohan and Raja Bandi to do a recce of the area around his farmhouse, and by sunset, he took us to a point nearby which was called “Bilekkal”. This is a corruption of “Bili Kallu” or white stone…
DSC09731

This is a large white monolithic rock (visible from right across the valley as we approached from Kanakapura)

DSC09712 - Copy

under which a woman is said to have lived and attained salvation, and where a small temple exists today.

DSC09735

Near the temple, one of the rocks had been painted into an elephant by someone with artistic imagination:

DSC09732

There were several similar rocks nearby:

DSC09745

Mohan and Raja stood at the edge of the small koLA (pond) formed in the rocks, and constructed with walls:

DSC09752

DSC09753

There is a “sripAdA” (divine footprint) there, too:

DSC09778

The area is planted with Plumeria (Frangipani) trees, which are also called Temple Trees:

DSC09786

On the rock, the “shankha-chakra” (conch and wheel), the marks of Vishnu, are painted:

DSC09782

The sight of the “bili kallu” with the evening sunshine on the clouds behind was stunning:

DSC09781

There are some other small shrines:

DSC09787

The inside of the small shrine is dim and inviting:

DSC09788

Stone wheels have been sculpted and then abandoned:

DSC09792

This couple are the only inhabitants of the area, and I think they take care of the temple (which doesn’t seem to have regular pujas).

DSC09803

However, a jAthrE (festival) had been held the previous week, and trash littered the place everywhere. We are hoping to form a volunteer group to educate the local people against littering, next year.

See my FaceBook album

here

Another view of the Bilekkal Temple:

DSC09791

We left after the sun set:

DSC09773

Pushcart vendor, Manipal, 090214

February 10, 2014

I first saw the pushcart in the evening glow.

DSC08768

The sun passed through the bottles, setting them alight.

DSC08769

Who was buying? Were they buying the liquid, or the light?

DSC08891

At night, the colours, instead of melting into the darkness, were even more vivid:

DSC08892

Makalidurga and Nandi Hills, 221213

December 23, 2013

Let me start with a beautiful bird…

DSC05338

Field report to the bngbirds egroup:

It was almost exactly three years to the day since I had been to Makalidurga.

click here to see that visit

Since we read the egroup report about the flurry of birds at Makalidurga, we decided that we’d visit again, and in the chilly dark hours of Sunday, we dilly-dallied perhaps a bit too much,

DSC05139

Dilly-dallying for MCS (Mandatory Chai Stop).

so that we finally got to Makalidurga (the Gopalaswamy temple area) only around 8.15 am after a leisurely breakfast at Dodballapur.

DSC05252

Common Lime, Makalidurga.

DSC05223

Common Kestrel, Makalidurga

.
DSC05174

Rufous-tailed Lark, Makalidurga

DSC05187

Pied Bushchat against the moon!

DSC05183

Life in Makalidurga.

DSC05176

Grasshopper, Makalidurga.

Though we cannot claim that bird sightings overwhelmed us, the birds that we did sight were very rewarding, and we watched several for a long while. Silverbills gathering nesting material; Rufous-tailed Larks foraging on the rocky path; Kestrels hovering; two Sirkeer Malkohas which gave me an exclusive sighting…so went the list of birds, and we were quite happy to soak in the wonderful scenery and the cool, bracing weather as well.

DSC05275

Pied Bushchat female, Makalidurga

DSC05263

Prashanti Express, Makalidurga.

We took a look at Gunjur Lake, as well, but it seems in a very dried-up state, and by the time we got there (nearly noon) there was no activity at all.

We decided that having come all this way, we would go to Nandi Hills as well.

DSC05299

Nandi betta.

We stopped at the base for lunch.

DSC05297

Lunch

DSC05346

Old pavilion at Nursery area, Nandi Hills.

My advice to anyone who is thinking of visiting Nandi Hills in the evening during this holiday period is simple, and consists of three words. Do not go.

The crowds were quite impressive, and I joked that instead of “birding” or “buttering” we would have to go “peopleing”. In spite of this, the Nursery area, where we spent most of our time, and the Nehru Nilaya area, did not disappoint. Olive-backed Pipits, Blue Rock Thrushes, Verditers, one male Asian Paradise Flyacatcher which Santosh captured in the course of changing from rufous to white… we wandered around, quite content with what we saw, and had a very pleasant time.

Birders:

Chandu
Kumuda
Mani
Santosh
Swethadri
and I.

DSC05351

Chandu and Mani

DSC05216

Chandu always has a balanced view

DSC05342

Santosh but not santosh!

DSC05323

Swethadri.

DSC05320

The beauty of the Nursery area.

DSC05317

Verditer Flycatcher, Nursery area.

DSC05303

Ashy Drongo.
DSC05300

Blue Rock Thrush male.

DSC05315

Lovely colours…

DSC05349

Almost done!

Thanks to Santosh for putting the bird list together. The Blue-faced Malkoha was rather doubtful, so it’s been left out.

DSC05339

Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher, Nandi Hills.

DSC05326

Santosh clicking the Tickell’s Blue (can you see where it is?)

DSC05347

DSC05348

The Camphor tree, Nandi Hills
Birds:

Sl no Name Where
1 Babbler, Jungle Makali
2 Barbet, White-cheeked Nandi
3 Bee-eater, Green Makali
4 Bulbul, Red-vented Makali
5 Bulbul, Red-whiskered Makali
6 Bulbul, White-browed Makali
7 Bushchat, Pied Makali
8 Crow, House Makali
9 Crow, Jungle Makali
10 Dove, Laughing Makali
11 Dove, Spotted Makali
12 Drongo, Ashy Nandi
13 Drongo, Black Makali
14 Drongo, White-bellied Nandi
15 Eagle (un-id) Makali
16 Flowerpecker, Pale-billed Makali
17 Flycatcher, Asian Brown Nandi
18 Flycatcher, Asian Paradise Nandi
19 Flycatcher, Red-throated Nandi
20 Flycatcher, Tickell’s Blue Nandi
21 Flycatcher, Verditer Nandi
22 Honey-buzzard, Oriental Nandi
23 Iora, Common Makali
24 Kestrel, Common Makali
25 Koel, Indian Makali
26 Lark, Rufous-tailed Makali
27 Malkoha, Sirkeer Makali
28 Myna, Common Makali
29 Oriole, Indian Golden Nandi
30 Parakeet, Rose-ringed Nandi
31 Prinia, Ashy Makali
32 Prinia, Plain Makali
33 Robin, Indian Makali
34 Shikra Makali
35 Shrike, Bay-backed Makali
36 Silverbill, Indian Makali
37 Spurfowl, Painted Makali
38 Sunbird, Lotens Makali
39 Sunbird, Purple Makali
40 Sunbird, Purple-rumped Makali
41 Swallow, Barn Makali
42 Swallow, Red-rumped Makali
43 Tailorbird, Common Nandi
44 Thrush, Blue Rock Makali
45 Warbler, Greenish Nandi

DSC05364

The kiss, Nandi Hills

To these I have to add, Kite, Common; Kite, Brahminy, Pigeon, Blue Rock, and Warbler, Booted (yes, yes, the eyebrow was there.). There was also the lone Olive-backed Pipit foraging in the Nursery “cage”. We did not see any of the other Thrushes. Some of the birds (eg Blue Rock Thrush)were sighted at both places. The Owlets that we usually see in the trees near Nandi Multicuisine Restaurant (where the road begins, just past the T-junction) were absent. We also *think* we sighted a Black Eagle, but we are not sure.

DSC05373

Red-breasted Flycatcher,Nandi, 221213

Apropos of this, we were wondering if there have been Owl/Owlet sightings from Nandi Hills, as none of us could recollect seeing any such reports…can the experts throw light on this?

DSC05366

Un id Caterpillar

DSC05332

Peninsular Rock Agama

Butterflies:

Blue, Various (Definitely Pea Blue and Lesser Grass Blue)
Castor, Common
Cerulean, Common
Coster, Tawny
Crow, Common
Emigrant, Mottled
Jezebel, Common
Lime, Common
Mormon, Common
Psyche
Rose, Common
Rose, Crimson
Tiger, Plain
Yellow, Three-spot Grass
Yellow, Spotless
Wanderer, Common

Various beetles, bugs, dragonflies, grasshoppers, and spiders.

I’ve put up my SMS on my FB album at

https://www.facebook.com/deemopahan/media_set?set=a.10151909137458878.1073742060.587058877&type=3

Including some of the fun items that we saw, when we were having lunch!

DSC05374

Dusk, Nandi Hills

DSC05377

Sunset, Nandi Hills

A pleasant and enjoyable day…thanks to my dear friends!