Posts Tagged ‘recording’

Record sighting of Demoiselle Crane, Hulimangala kere, 131215

December 15, 2015

At the last minute, on Sunday morning, I convinced 20 other birders that instead of going to Valley School, we should bird along the Kaggalipura-Bannerghatta stretch, and then go to check out Hulimangala. And there, at nearly the end of a long birding outing, we saw a migrant which has never before been sighted in the Bangalore area…the

Demoiselle Crane

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Can you spot the Crane in its habitat?

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Here it is:

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Here’s the video of its foraging and preening behaviour, which I took on 181215:

Demoiselle cranes undertake one of the toughest migrations in the world….as tough as that of the

Bar-headed Geese

From late August through September, they gather in flocks of up to 400 individuals and prepare for their flight to their winter range. During their migratory flight south, demoiselles fly like all cranes, with their head and neck straight forward and their feet and legs straight behind, reaching altitudes of 16,000-26,000 feet (4,875-7,925 m). Along their arduous journey they have to cross the Himalayan mountains to get to their over-wintering grounds in India. Many die from fatigue, hunger and predation from golden eagles.

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The demoiselle crane is known as the Koonj (कूंज, کونج, ਕੂੰਜ) in the languages of North India, and figure prominently in the literature, poetry and idiom of the region. Beautiful women are often compared to the koonj because its long and thin shape is considered graceful. Metaphorical references are also often made to the koonj for people who have ventured far from home or undertaken hazardous journeys.

In Khichan, Rajasthan in India, villagers feed the cranes on their migration and these large congregations have become an annual spectacle.

The name koonj is derived from the Sanskrit word kraunch, which is a cognate Indo-European term for crane itself, In the mythology of Valmiki, the composer of the Hindu epic Ramayana, it is claimed that his first verse was inspired by the sight of a hunter kill the male of a pair of Demoiselle Cranes that were courting. Observing the lovelorn female circling and crying in grief, he cursed the hunter in verse. Since tradition held that all poetry prior to this moment had been revealed rather than created by man, this verse concerning the Demoiselle Cranes is regarded as the first human-composed meter.

How does the English name of the Crane come about?

Queen Marie Antoinette of France gave the demoiselle crane its name. Demoiselle means maiden, or young lady, in French (one is more familiar with “mademoiselle”). The queen was enchanted by the crane’s delicate and maidenly appearance.

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Here’s the response from N S Prashanth (“Daktre”) who is very knowledgeable on the subject:

“Nice record Deepa! I see that the most recent southern Karnataka record is by Shivaprakash from Kollegal (south-west of Bangalore). He includes the following interesting notes on its previous rare sightings in and around Mysore as comments in his record (see linked checklist). He too has sighted a solitary bird amid Black-headed Ibis. Thought you may find this useful.
“These have been recorded at Yelandur & Nanajangudu (nearby area) reported by Phythian-Adams (1940), Asian Mid-winter waterfowl census 23.1.1992 at Maddur Kere near the place where earlier recorded by VIjayalaxmi Rao, Guruprasad P & others and on 28.01.2001 in KRS backwaters by Shivaprakash A, Ramesh S & Mohankumar M.
References:
Phythian-Adams, E. G. 1940. Small game-shooting in Mysore. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 41: 594-603
Shivaprakash, A. 2002a. Re-occurrence of Demoiselle Crane in Mysore district. Newsletter for Birdwatchers: 42(1):8”

And he also gives the reference list on eBird,

here

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Here’s the factsheet for this bird:
Class AVES
Order GRUIFORMES
Suborder GRUES
Family GRUIDAE
Name (Scientific)Grus virgo
Name (English) Demoiselle crane
Name (French) Grue demoiselle
Hindi: Karkara, Koonj

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Here is a beautiful video (link provided by David d’Costa), showing how these birds migrate at such incredible heights, crossing the snowy peaks:

Here’s Prem Prakash Garg’s video of what I think is the male, taken the next day (14 Dec 2015)

I have since got information that there are at least two individuals on the lake. But here’s the first one sighted!

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Found a new, simple recording site…

November 18, 2013

I will no longer be able to record at Muziboo, the site when I had an account and where I had recorded some songs. So I recorded this small song for KTB at Vocaroo:

Record music and voice >>

The words are:

Saraswati charaNam
sakala varamum thantharuLuvAy (S)

thAyum nIyE thanthaiyum nIyE
sarva jeeva dayA nidhiyE
uyirum nIye udalum nIye
uyarntha uyarntha umbar dEviyE (S)

ambikai manOhariyE Adi shakthi nIyandrO
nambinOrai kAkkum nalla nAyakiyum nIyandrO
(thAyum nIye….till end)

This was my mother’s school prayer song…probably in the 1930’s!

I also recorded a few slokA for the children, here:

Record music and voice >>

These are KTB’s most-listened-to favourites

Moved from Evoca to Muziboo

September 23, 2008

Evoca progressively cut down the time and then sent an email asking me to stump up $30 or my account would be deleted. (Not, we will keep your account, of course, but make it a paid one, but….pay or we will delete.) So a kind friend helped me and moved all my songs so far to

Muziboo

The name may be awkward but it’s a good. mewpsych…if you are still active on LJ…do shift your music, too!

Two lovely sights in the sky

September 26, 2007

Yesterday, a few of us who write for Metroblogs were interviewed by Channel V for a program they are shooting across 8 cities.

Of course I took my little camera along…but apart from the very interesting evening, I saw what I call the smallest rainbow:

the smallest rainbow 250907

And within a few minutes, the nearly full moon was scudding through the clouds…

moon is nearly full 250907

I am still feeling miserable for many reasons, but sights such as these really lift my spirits…the best things in life ARE sometimes free!

I thoroughly enjoyed meeting the other Metrobloggers, and will be writing about Janet, who plants trees for free…thought of rohan_kini when I met her.

Two lovely sights in the sky

September 26, 2007

Yesterday, a few of us who write for Metroblogs were interviewed by Channel V for a program they are shooting across 8 cities.

Of course I took my little camera along…but apart from the very interesting evening, I saw what I call the smallest rainbow:

the smallest rainbow 250907

And within a few minutes, the nearly full moon was scudding through the clouds…

moon is nearly full 250907

I am still feeling miserable for many reasons, but sights such as these really lift my spirits…the best things in life ARE sometimes free!

I thoroughly enjoyed meeting the other Metrobloggers, and will be writing about Janet, who plants trees for free…thought of rohan_kini when I met her.

Wildlife and the many dangers it faces…

June 22, 2007

I am uploading the pictures taken during our wonderful trip to Nandi Hills on 19th June, and the short visit to Madivala Lake on 21st June… but want to post, first, these graphic pictures of what our wildlife faces….

We were climbing up to the top of Nandi Hills when, almost as if wanting to give us a great show, a pair of Egyptian vultures began soaring right overhead; we scrambled to get good shots. Satisfied, we were just lowering our cameras when this bird struggled past:

Black Kite with Plastic bag 19Jun07 Nandi Hills

In this shot, too, you can see the bird’s talons caught in the plastic bag. It repeatedly flew close to the ground in an attempt to try and work the plastic bag off; obviously, the bag was hindering its flight…

Black Kite with Plastic Caught in Talon Nandi Hill 19Jun07

A little later, we also saw a black kite with a string of faded flowers trailing from its leg, trying to shake it off in exactly the same fashion, with another kite actually trying to help it. We went a little further and found a large trash dump, which was where the kites were feeding, and getting entangled in rubbish…

And when we went to Madivala Lake yesterday, we found this juvenile Pond Heron, with a broken leg…and with three people just waiting behind the perimeter fence to take it away for their evening meal….

Distressed pond heron Madivala Lake 21 Jun07

The hunched posture, the lack of shine in the feathers, the nictitating membrane pulled over the eye…they all told the sad story. We called up
People for Animals , the animal shelter that we visited earlier, which has been doing great work for the past ten years. Finally, sainath, sanath, and I brought the bird home to my place, where I wrapped it up in some soft material and put it securely in a cardboard bag, and Sainath delivered it to a shelter volunteer. Alas, it was all in vain. The bird died early this morning, and Dr Somnath, the vet at PfA, said that the fracture was not in the leg, but at the hip, and was a multiple, compound fracture, which must have happened 2 or 3 days ago. The young bird really didn’t stand a chance, he said.

The bird actually had a piece of dirty cloth tied to its leg, and we are still trying to speculate how that could have happened.

Yes, if the bird never had a chance, perhaps it was better for it to die…but now I am really wondering…would it then have been wrong, as we thought, to let those people take it home and make a meal of it? Would that not have been its fate had a predator seen it before we did? It might have fed a poor family…the answers are never black-and-white to such dilemmas….

Not even the fact that one song from my Carnatic music concert was aired on “Suvarna” TV channel this morning, and that I have got it (without any colour though!) on my 12-year-old VCR, makes me feel good about these things.

Nandi Hills photographs coming up soon…GAWD it takes EONS to download from camera, crop and zoom, upload to Flickr…HOW do these other photographers EVER get anything else done, I wonder.

My accompanists….

May 7, 2007

I include, once again, a photo of the recording session, as it would appear to the video cameraman:

Final recording

(er..that blue light behind my head is not my mood at being sweated and bitten half to death…it’s a light kept just behind me!)

And now, I would like to introduce the three people who accompanied me; each is such an interesting person.

In order of protocol, I must introduce Mr K V Raja Iyengar, the violinist. How old do you think he is? How old would you guess? I guessed 63 or 64…and learnt that he is…83 years old! Isn’t that incredible? He has been trained in both the Carnatic and North Indian styles of classical Indian music; is a recipient of the Karnataka Sangeetha Nrutya Award. He was on the staff of the Dharwad Station of All India Radio, and has been playing for longer than I have lived…On the day that I recorded my concert, he had played for artistes from 8am…and went home with us at 9 pm!

On the extreme left-hand side is Mr B N Ramesh, who plays the mridangam. I knew him, first, as the brother of the well-known flautist, Mr B N Suresh, who passed away at a very young age. Mr Ramesh has been in the corporate sector until recently, when his interest in tarot card reading suddenly took off in a big way, with many friends asking him to do readings for them. He took training in this arcane art in Chennai and now is into it almost full-time. He says new clients have been flocking to him after the newspapers carried articles about him, and word-of-mouth is also a major advertising factor for him. Mr Ramesh has been a good friend of mine for over a decade now. For tarot readings, you can contact him at

neeli_ramessh@yahoo.com

Between Mr Ramesh and me is Mr Satish Pathakotta, who plays the Khanjira, and also the mridangam (though he now concentrates on the former instrument.) Mr Satish lived in the US for 11 years before deciding that his children should grow up in India, and came back to reside in Bangalore. In the US,he says, he played for all the top artistes when they visited; here the competition is much more intense! He now works in the corporate sector, but his passion for music keeps him playing.

People are so fascinating…as you get to know them, you realize that the facet they show you is but one of several parts of their personality! I was happy to get to know my accompanists better!

Protected: Asianet…the cheapos,,,and here’s the account of the recording

May 6, 2007

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What I will be doing day after tomorrow…

April 30, 2007

http://bangalore.metblogs.com/archives/2007/04/new_tv_channel.phtml

Wish me luck, and hope that I don’t fall flat on my face…figuratively, not literally..