Posts Tagged ‘kaveri’

Sunset and Sunrise on the Kaveri, 06 and 070115

January 14, 2015

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And now for the next morning’s sunrise…

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Using others’ homes, Road to Galibore, 201214

December 22, 2014

While birding on the road to Galibore, Karnataka,on the banks of the Kaveri, in the Cauvery Wild Life Sanctuary (CWLS), we obseved some abandoned nests of the Baya Weavers.

We found that some Scaly-breasted Munias were now using the nests, and for a while, we watched these little beauties flying into, and away, from the nests.

A little later, though, our attention was arrested by the call of a

RUFOUS TREEPIE

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which we found flying from nest to nest.

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It kept picking at the dried grass that made up the nests:

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I could not understand whether it was foraging for insects in the grasses, or if it was unpicking the grass reeds to use in a nest of its own.

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At one point, I found the bird actually putting its head into the opening of one of the nests, as if to try and get in.

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Here’s the Treepie on the nest:

I took another one, too:

The

Wiki entry on this bird

does not mention anything about this behaviour. I wonder if I could get some more information about this…was the bird just being opportunistic?

The bird list of this trip. on eBird is at

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20983466

The road, the river, the birds, the beings…Galibore trip,221114

December 3, 2014

The road…

It unites so many lives.

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People drive on it

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Some just walk on it

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Some lead their animals on it..

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Sometimes buildings, especially temples, are built right on it..

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Eateries survive near it:

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Several creatures thrive near it:

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My friends discuss their photographs, standing on it:

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There are havens at the end of the road:

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On an urban road is the statue of a bird-lover:

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The River.

The Kaveri is beautiful…

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The birds:

Rose-ringed Parakeet at nest:

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Rosy Starlings and Common Mynas:

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Pied Bushchat:

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Grey Heron:

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Spot-billed Pelican:

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Spot-billed Duck:

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Fish in the water:

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Paddyfield Pipit:

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Painted Stork:

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Short-toed Snake Eagle:

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Red-wattled Lapwing:

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White-throated Kingfisher:

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Oriental Honey Buzzard:

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Plants:

Leo otis, or Lion’s Ear:

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Gall on the leaves:

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A beautiful wildflower:

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the Shankha Pushpi (Shell flower)

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A jewel bug:

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Grass Yellows mud-puddling:

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A tiny, perfect grasshopper:

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A dragonfly:

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If you want to suffer even more photos, see my FB album

here

Let me close with this view of the Kaveri:

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Visit to Galibore, Cauvery WLS, 150214: Life…and death

February 19, 2014

She’s beautiful, the Goddess Kaveri:

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Some forms of life that I saw:

WHITE-RUMPED SHAMA:

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LARGE CUCKOO-SHRIKE:

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YELLOW-FOOTED GREEN PIGEONS:

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SIRKEER MALKOHA:

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SHIKRA silhouette:

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SPOTTED OWLET:

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INDIAN ROBIN:

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ROSE-RINGED PARAKEET (feasting on a watermelon in an angry farmer’s field…!)

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BAY-BACKED SHRIKE:

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BLACK-TAILED GODWIT:

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BLUE-FACED MALKOHA:

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SILVERBILLS:

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JERDON’S BUSHLARK:

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Vendors:

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a beautiful, spreading village tree:

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a cobbler plying his trade (while preparing to chew his paan)

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a flower seller:

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flowers of the

FISH POISON tree:

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hungry brefus-eaters:

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I found the incredible colours of death, too:

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JLR Explore: Cauvery WLS Bird Census, 100114

February 18, 2014

Click here

for my article about the Cauvery WS Bird Census, in JLR Explore.

The Malkoha, Galibore, 150214

February 15, 2014

The

MALKOHA

has a name derived from the Sinhala word for the Red-faced Malkoha; Mal-Koha meaning flower-cuckoo. They are large birds in the cuckoo family,Cuculidae, all in the genus Phaenicophaeus. (That name derives from the Ancient Greek phoiniko- “crimson”, and phaes “eyes” or “face”.)

In Karnataka, I see two of these birds; the more common is the

BLUE-FACED MALKHOHA , (Phaenicophaeus viridirostris)

This is a shy bird that eats a variety of insects, caterpillars and small vertebrates, and,occasionally, berries too. It is not a powerful flier.

According to the wikipaedia, there are 11 varieties of the Malkoha in the Indian subcontinent.

Here’s the Malkoha in the Neem tree:

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The way the bird can normally be seen, skulking in the foliage:

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The other Malkoha I’ve seen in Karnataka is the

SIRKEER MALKOHA (Phaenicophaeus leschenaultii)

The scientific name of this bird commemorates the French botanist Jean Baptiste Leschenault de la Tour.

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This bird talks about amongst thickets like the Coucal or Crow-Pheasant, searching for food; insects, lizards, fallen fruits and berries.It runs swiftly through undergrowth looking like mongoose. It is a feeble flier, but ascends trees rapidly, hopping from branch to branch with great agility, like the Coucal.

Malkohas are non-parasitic cuckoos, building their own nests and laying eggs.

Here’s a short video of the Sirkeer that I took at Galibore, in the Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary:

and here it is, eating berries:

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It’s always a delight to spot these birds, and observe their behaviour…but they generally manage to disappear in a short while!

Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary: Wings and Six Feet

November 6, 2013

On our visit to the Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary, several birds thrilled us through the day.

this

TAWNY EAGLE

put in a thrilling appearance, and was mobbed by crows:

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A distant

BAY-BACKED SHRIKE

smiled at us:

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Everywhere there were

PIED WAGTAILS:

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It’s only when we see the

BLACK-WINGED STILT

out of the water, that we see how well-named it is!

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This

GREEN SANDPIPER

was cleaning itself:

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a

GREY HERON

walked gracefully through the water:

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several

GREAT TITS

hopped around:

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some

BRAHMINY STARLINGS

sat on a wire.

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A female

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and a male

PURPLE-RUMPED SUNBIRD

appeared:

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SMALL GREEN BEE-EATERS

were around:

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this

INDIAN ROLLER

was posing well:

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BLACK DRONGOS

have arrived in force!

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We listened to the cacaphony of the

JUNGLE BABBLERS:

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Love and grooming go on, side by side!

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BAYA WEAVERS

at their nests:

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We saw a group of

EUROPEAN BEE-EATERS:

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(taken at high zoom…the idiot birds were far away from the road and we had to beat a path through heavy scrub and fields…still could not get close.)

We stopped at a roadside pond in Sathanur:

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The pond had this

BRONZE-WINGED JACANA:

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COMMON MOORHEN:

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There were two

BRAHMINY KITES

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eyeing a family of

COMMON COOTS

chugging through the water, until, at last, one them got one of the babies.

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until finally, we saw one Kite attack, lift a little one successfully, and fly off…

A

POND HERON

caught a huge fish, and struggled to swallow it:

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********************

Several insects and butterflies caught my attention.

TAWNY COSTER

in the greenery:

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WHITE ORANGE-TIP:

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YELLOW ORANGE-TIP:

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COMMON GULL:

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CRIMSON ROSE on the Lantana:

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LEMON PANSY:

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BLUE TIGER male:

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SEVEN-SPOT BURNET MOTH:

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PIERROT:

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several

DRAGONFLIES

zipped around:

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The bird list:
Babbler, Jungle
Barbet, Coppersmith
Barbet, White-cheeked
Bee-eater, European
Bee-eater, Green
Bulbul, Red-vented
Bulbul, Red-whiskered
Bulbul, White-browed
Bushchat, Pied
Bushlark, Indian
Bushlark, Jerdon’s
Buzzard, Oriental Honey
Cisticola, Zitting
Coot, Common
Cormorant, Little
Coucal, Greater
Crow, House
Crow, Large-billed(Jungle)
Dove, Laughing
Dove, Spotted
Drongo, Ashy
Drongo, Black
Duck, Lesser Whistling
Eagle, Lesser Fish
Eagle, Tawny
Egret, Cattle
Egret, Little
Egret, Intermediate
Flowerpecker, Pale-billed
Flycatcher, Asian Brown
Flycatcher, Asian Paradise
Francolin, Grey
Grebe, Little
Heron, Grey
Heron, Indian Pond
Jacana, Bronze-winged
Kingfisher, White-throated
Kite, Black
Koel, Asian
Lapwing, Red-wattled
Lark, Ashy-crowned Sparrow
Moorhen, Common
Munia,Black-headed
Munia, Scaly-breasted
Myna, Common
Myna, Jungle
Oriole, Black-naped
Owl, Brown Fish
Owlet, Jungle
Parakeet, Rose-ringed
Pigeon, Blue Rock
Pipit, Paddyfield
Prinia, Ashy
Robin, Indian
Robin, Oriental Magpie
Roller, Indian
Sandpiper, Green
Shikra
Shrike, Bay-backed
Silverbill, Indian
Sparrow, House
Starling, Brahminy
Starling, Rosy
Stilt, Black-winged
Sunbird, Purple
Sunbird, Purple-rumped
Swallow, Barn
Swallow, Red-rumped
Swamphen, Purple(Moorhen)
Swift, Common
Tailorbird, Common
Tern, River
Tit, Great
Treepie, Rufous
Wagtail, White-browed (Pied)
Warbler, Greenish (Leaf)
Weaver, Baya

The six-footer list:

Blues, Various
Castor, Common
Crow, Common
Eggfly, Great
Emigrant, Common
Emigrant, Mottled
Gull, Common
Jewel, Grass
Jezebel, Common
Mormon, Blue
Mormon, Common
Pansy, Chocolate
Pansy, Lemon
Pierrot, Common
Psyche
Rose, Common
Rose, Crimson
Tiger, Blue
Tiger, Common
Wanderer, Common
Yellow, Common Grass
Yellow, Three-spot Grass
Yellow, Spotless

Various Beetles, Bugs, Dragonflies, Damselflies,Moths, Spiders.

Mammals list:

Boar, Wild
Jackal, Indian
Mongoose, Indian
Squirrel, Grizzled Giant
Squirrel, Three-striped Palm

Let me close with this

COMMON WANDERER
female:

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What a treasure house of creation the Kaveri area is!

Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary: The people, and the scenery

November 6, 2013

I was given a sudden, late-night query: Would I like to visit the Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary?

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My companions were Apoorva Managoli, her dad Dr Sanjeev Managoli,and Vaibhav Chowdhary…that was like Black Forest with 3 different flavours of ice-cream! No, Sanjeev is not a car-diologist, but it was his new vehicle!

He also had a new toy:

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I’m making a separate post about the birds, and the six-footers.

The road passed through beautiful land:

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We indulged in some mammal photography, little knowing that our mammal sightings in the evenig were going to be very good!

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Temples were being decorated:

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The goddess,Kaveri, revealed herself in all her beauty:

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The endangered

GRIZZLED GIANT SQUIRREL

was around:

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and here’s the large nest:

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the majesty of the trees at the JLR campus was staggering:

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Apoorva posed with Harish, who was our guide for the Squirrel, the Jungle Owlet, and other delights on the JLR campus:

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The forest often gives us gifts to disperse:

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Several wild plants and flowers delighted me:

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A carpet dotted with red:

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Our final destination became Galibore JLR:

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The rain clouds lovingly wrapped themselves around the hills:

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Rustic living on the banks of a lake looks picturesque, but may not be comfortable!

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Houses were decorated beautifully:

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Sericulture was in progress:

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How can I forget the food? Here’s brefus at Kanakapura:

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And here are elevenses:

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Gaily decorated vehicles (I don’t know how the drivers could see anything of the road!) were all around:

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The balance

September 22, 2012

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When you’re a monkey
Life’s dory and hunky…
You can balance on things
That end in round rings…
It’s a sitting position that’s funky!

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April 2, 2012

The second day of the waxing phase (shukla paksha) of the moon is always very difficult to see, but this time, as we were coming back from Bheemeshwari (Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary) last Saturday (the 24th of March), we came to the small village of Muthathi, and found the villagers standing around, pointing at the western sky. When I asked some of them, they took the trouble to explain that this moon, after the Kannada New Year,was considered an auspicious sighting. So I too took aim and sighted the dwitheeya, or the second day of Chandra:

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It was quite tough to see the thin sliver at first, but as the sunlight faded from orange to purple to indigo, the beautiful crescent was easier to spot…but not easier to photograph! Here Chandra (this is one of the Indian names which is for both men and women!) is, showing the beauty of our nearest neighbour in space (vyOm), seen through the forest of the Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary:

Here is an entry

about the moon, where, about 4 years ago, I’d written:

The moon
Sets so soon
Over my city….
Perhaps she waxes and wanes
From the energy she loses and gains
She looks lovely at the full…
When she draws up tides with her pull…
So thin she looks now……a pity
That she can’t always be a full moon.
But we don’t have the boon
Of making the most of ourselves, and being the best.
We wax and wane, too….sometimes being more, sometimes less.

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