Posts Tagged ‘health’

Health worries: K1 and K2

April 25, 2018

of experience she has seen cases that are totally asymptomatic. She has seen an 80 year old patient who was completely unaware that she even had the condition and perfectly ok vision. She has seen children who came at the same age that ours did, are older now with no reported loss so far.

K1 does already have symptoms in that she has poor night vision – we started to notice this even at Age 2. But the doc today said that her central retina looks healthy and that her vision is good. She said that in unfamiliar environments, she will not be able to navigate in dim light. Yesterday’s doc suggested that she always carry a flashlight with her.

Today’s doctor also confirmed that genetic testing may help understand the prognosis (progress timeline) because there are a great many genetic causes for the condition. She also suggested that while there was no indication of need, for our peace of mind we could get an ENT test done as well.

K2’s condition is much more mild, and therefore, less clearly diagnosed, but changes on the retina still evident. Since it is so clear for K1, there is little doubt as to what it may be for him. She did not suggest that K2’s retina is at an “earlier stage” of the same thing or anything like that – basically his retina could become more affected with time or may not change at all. He has had no vision related complaints.

The doc didn’t recommend ERG (Electro Retinogram) for now because it is an uncomfortable procedure (electrodes inside the eyelid among other things) and if the kids don’t cooperate the results will not be accurate. She also didn’t recommend field testing (sitting in a ball and pressing buttons when they see lights flash around them to determine how much loss there may be) because both appear to have no loss in field vision at the moment. So we shall seek out genetic testing for the whole fam to see how much detail we can obtain regarding what genes are causing this and what science may already be or become available us.

The next step is to get them glasses for their nearsightedness (both have astigmatism and power) and come back for evaluation in 6 months. She stressed a balanced diet for them both, but specified that there was no known way to arrest the deterioration or affect the progress of the condition.That being said, we shall read and will likely ensure our diet contains things like Vitamin A palmitate etc. which have some reported success in arresting the deterioration. Also, we have well known Ayurveda centers specifically for the eyes, so we shall go in for a consultation.

If you know ophthalmologists first hand, or have direct experience with this condition, we welcome your inputs.

Two thoughts that are helping us at the moment:
1) Random crap can happen any time but the more notice we have, the better we can respond.
2) We are more than our bodies.

Please hold positive thoughts for both our kids to retain their vision; to remain as asymptomatic as possible, with either no deterioration over their lives or the least & slowest possible.

DnA

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Health worries: K1 and K2, 230418

April 24, 2018

This is what has been going on with K1 and K2, we were rather upset over the past few days, but now we are sort of accepting things and hoping for the best.

As of now, we have ordered the glasses for both the children, and the doc says the improvement in general vision will be perceptible, and that we should keep monitoring the condition every 6 months.

This upset us very much initially, but in a way, there is a relief in knowing that at least for the immediate future, there is nothing to be done.
=

Message from to our immediate family:

Yesterday (23 Apr 18) during testing for near sightedness and to get glasses, the eye doctors told us that K1 had a congenital condition called Retinitis Pigmentosa and K2 looked like he may have it too. At its worst, this condition causes loss of vision over time that could be complete, or just allow for tunnel vision (blackness surrounding a small area visible due to central retina functioning) by Age 35-40. This was devastating to hear yesterday and overwhelming to digest. The doctor had started telling us to “inform the children that sight is not the only thing in life” and that was very hard to take.

However, today, after taking a second opinion from Dr Savita Arun of Nethradhama, we have some hope that at its best, it could remain asymptomatic without much deterioration or loss or progress a lot slower.

Today, with second opinion, the diagnosis is confirmed for both children. The second doctor said pretty much all the same things that the doctors yesterday did, except with far more positivity. In her 18 years of experience she has seen cases that are totally asymptomatic. She has seen an 80 year old patient who was completely unaware that she even had the condition and perfectly ok vision. She has seen children who came at the same age that ours did, are older now with no reported loss so far.

K1 does already have symptoms in that she has poor night vision – we started to notice this even at Age 2. But the doc today said that her central retina looks healthy and that her vision is good. She said that in unfamiliar environments, she will not be able to navigate in dim light. Yesterday’s doc suggested that she always carry a flashlight with her.

Today’s doctor also confirmed that genetic testing may help understand the prognosis (progress timeline) because there are a great many genetic causes for the condition. She also suggested that while there was no indication of need, for our peace of mind we could get an ENT test done as well.

K2’s condition is much more mild, and therefore, less clearly diagnosed, but changes on the retina still evident. Since it is so clear for K1, there is little doubt as to what it may be for him. She did not suggest that K2’s retina is at an “earlier stage” of the same thing or anything like that – basically his retina could become more affected with time or may not change at all. He has had no vision related complaints.

The doc didn’t recommend ERG (Electro Retinogram) for now because it is an uncomfortable procedure (electrodes inside the eyelid among other things) and if the kids don’t cooperate the results will not be accurate. She also didn’t recommend field testing (sitting in a ball and pressing buttons when they see lights flash around them to determine how much loss there may be) because both appear to have no loss in field vision at the moment. So we shall seek out genetic testing for the whole fam to see how much detail we can obtain regarding what genes are causing this and what science may already be or become available us.

The next step is to get them glasses for their nearsightedness (both have astigmatism and power) and come back for evaluation in 6 months. She stressed a balanced diet for them both, but specified that there was no known way to arrest the deterioration or affect the progress of the condition.That being said, we shall read and will likely ensure our diet contains things like Vitamin A palmitate etc. which have some reported success in arresting the deterioration. Also, we have well known Ayurveda centers specifically for the eyes, so we shall go in for a consultation.

If you know ophthalmologists first hand, or have direct experience with this condition, we welcome your inputs.

Two thoughts that are helping us at the moment:
1) Random crap can happen any time but the more notice we have, the better we can respond.
2) We are more than our bodies.

Please hold positive thoughts for both our kids to retain their vision; to remain as asymptomatic as possible, with either no deterioration over their lives or the least & slowest possible.

DnA

Periods and pads…

February 12, 2018

There is much adulation of the movie,

click here to watch the trailer

“Padman”

which is based on the achievements of

Muruganatham

who has given a TED talk about what he did for his wife.

However, I also received, on my wellness egroup, the link to a blogpost with a different point of view, very interesting, read it

Ma href=”https://mythrispeaks.wordpress.com/2018/02/09/padman-the-real-story-of-how-he-shot-to-fame-by-sehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arunachalam_Murugananthamlling-shame/”> here

I am not for the fictionalization and/or glorification of anyone while that person is living. When some time has elapsed, one gets a better perspective about who the person was, and what that person achieved, or failed to. In this sense, I think making a commercial movie about something which has not yet been tried and tested enough was not a wise thing to do. However, this is only my opinion.

But I am not wriring about that topic; I just want to share my own experience with my periods.I hate to share this, but I think I should. (My way of dealing with it was to try and expunge it from my mind once I reached menopause…but as you can see, the memories have not left me).

I grew up (and “grew up” at the age of 12, in 1966) in a large city, but had to manage with cloth, and it was messy, smelly, uncomfotable-to-painful, and very embarassing. Sanitary napkins were available, but my mother, thinking they were not a good solution, did not buy them for me until a couple of years later. My cousins in Chennai, and in the smaller towns of Tamil Nadu, also managed with cloth; we had to use discarded cloth, too. The menstrual period was truly a curse, and yes, it was the lack of proper protection as much as cramps that made me detest going to school and then college on “those days”.Even sanitary napkins did not have plastic shields in those days, and were made of cotton which could lump together, especially in hot, humid weather.

Since we were “exiled” to the back of our (then) large houses and given food only after the rest of the household had eaten, and were not allowed to touch anyone or go out, I was told by my cousins in Chennai, Madurai and other towns, to use medications like Primolut-N. We were made to feel, and felt, unclean and impure. I have heard my uncles use the phrase “kasappu kadai” (butcher’s shop) to indicate that someone had her period. “Not at home” and “far away”, denoting the way we were made to stay at the back of the house or in villages, in the cowsheds outside the house, show the “reverence” that we got.

https://www.dokteronline.com/en/primolut-n

to delay the period for a few days. Every single cousin I knew who used this had her first pregnancy miscarry; I do not have enough data to know if this was just a coincidence. I cannot draw any inference from seven cases.

I attained menopause (with huge relief, and no other problems such as excessive bleeding or fibroids) at the age of 42, 21 years ago. (A fairly active lifestyle has, luckily, kept me in good health.)So I am not aware of what sanitary napkins are made of these days. When my grandchildren were born, we used cloth nappies as I was taking care of them 24/7; I didn’t like the idea of disposable nappies for many reasons, and I stitched pieces of soft, old dhotis for this purpose. We had to use the occasional disposable nappy, of course. But I was already reading about fires iin landfills in St.Louis, where my daughter lived (she used reusable pads) so we cut down on disposable nappies as much as we could.

The studies cited in the blogpost seem quite extensive and fact-based, but the point I am trying to make is, the use of cloth may not be related to health problems, but it is certainly related to a big factor of discomfort and embarassment…which, if the write-up is true, the “pad” does nothing to alleviate.

How comforable and secure is the cup? I have been doing a bit of reading about it, and I do feel there may be instances where it may not be suitable, or it may take a while to find the right one.

https://menstrualcupreviews.net/menstrual-cup-dangers/

I’m sorry, but I disagree with the writer’s statement about traditional women showing us “how mensturation should be revered , how the first period should be celebrated”. We were treated as outcastes during our periods, and given no consideration in the matter of food. Mensturation was not revered, it was a matter of shame and withdrawal. Most mothers would not tell their daughters about it in advance…my mother did not mention it, and at first, I thought that I was badly hurt. (I have no sisters, and no cousin talked to me about this, either).I still cringe when I think of the child I was, and my ignorance about my own body. Ignorance is not innocence.

I have hated every period that I had, the very painful (epidurals were not given those days) process of childbirth, the mood swings,the awful cramping, and the bloating. My reproductive system shutting down was , to me, one of the best things that happened, especially because it was rather early.

I am not taking any stances here, simply saying that menstruation is a very tough process that most women handle by themselves, or at least, used to before they could look for information on the net in the privacy of their homes or phones.

Sorry for the sombre post. But most of you on this egroup are young, and I just wanted to depict how things were, a few decades ago, in metropolitan cities and towns (not villages).

Meeting with the head of the hospital, Fortis, Bannerghatta Road, 071217

December 7, 2017

I had a long meeting (made longer by the delay in getting his visiting cards!) with Dr Manish Mtatoo, the head of Fortis Hospitals, Bannerghatta Road. I had a few major points to convey:
1. In spite of being an educated, articulate person, I did not find any process in place, to route my grievance through, when I found a lack of service in the hospital. I want other patients, too, or their representatives, whatever their level of literacy or awareness, to be given a concrete channel of grievance which is made clear to them at the time of their admission to the hospital.

2. I want billing practices to be improved in the following ways: Operation Theatre (OT) consumables and charges itemized separately, with the patient having the ability to cross-check the items with the doctor/surgeon, in case of a dispute. Other consumables to be itemized on the bill, with the patitent (or the family or friends) being able to query them. Not every patient will need, or want, this facility, but it should be in place for those who need it.

3.A system of prompt refund of any items over-charged, and a system that does not mandate the entire estimated amount to be paid upfront by the patient before surgery is allowed to proceed. Dr Manish denied that this was the case, but it certainly happened to me, and I am sure I am not the only one. I had to pay Rs. 1,50,000 upfront, and a refund of a single over-charged item which somehow escaped the detailed querying by my daughter, took 10 days to be credited.

4.I took along a friend of mine, Tara Ollapally, who is a legal mediator, to ask the hospital to build a system whereby, in the event of a grievance or of lack of service by the hospital (whether administration, billing, or medical/nursing care) , the patient or the representative can have the option to have a legal mediator (a neutral third party) present in the meeting between the hospital and the patient, guiding both to a practical and pragmatic solution, rather than a path to our time- and money-consuming courts.

Dr Manish and Nayna Pai both agreed to the point of view presented, and did mention that they would also want such practices embedded. Dr Manish mentioned how,often patients and their representatives threaten and do actually take physical action against doctors and hospitals. The idea is to reduce this culture of confrontation, where one party is aways jockeying for superiority with the bottom line being money, not the issues at hand.

If I am given clear documentation in the near future, that Fortis Hospitals, Bannerghatta Road, has changed the billing system, with more clarity and transparency, and is working, long-term, towards making patients more aware of their rights in querying hospital practices, I will certainly change my present opinion of them, and be willing to agree that there is hope for positive change.

As of now…my perception is that I don’t want to ever enter a hospital… or a court of law….if I can help it! I feel both may take years of my life, and/or chunks of my money, with nothing to show for it.

How some balloons are useful!

December 2, 2017

Nature Feature on CitMat, Dec ’17

I often come across the

Balloon Vine

(also called “Love in a puff”)

IMG_6517

on my walks through the fields and forests around my city. It’s a very common vine, indeed….and in fact, in New Zealand, it is identified as a prohibited pest plant! However, in Kerala, the flower of this vine  is one of the ten “sacred flowers”

Seed pod and flowers:

DSCN8044

I found that the scientific name for the genus of this vine is “Cardiospermum”. The name intrigued me, until a friend and avid amateur botanist, Ajit Ampalakkad, showed me the seeds inside the “balloons”. Each seed was attached to the seed pod, and when removed, that area showed a beautiful heart-shaped pattern.

DSC04293

Hence…”cardio”, meaning heart, and “spermum” meaning seed. Voila! A tough-sounding scientific name was explained.

But there were more interesting things about this vine to be discovered; I realized that it has anti-diarrhoeal and homoeopathic properties.

Ripe seed pod:

DSC07747-001

Here

is a blog by Ramya Venkateshwaran in April 2015,  describing the various ways the leaves of this vine can be prepared.

I also came across this video, part of a food/travel series called “Suttralam Suvaikkalam”, hosted by

Rakesh Raghunathan

in which the green leaves are ground and added to rice batter to make tasty dosai (not dosas, which is a pan-Indian term…dosai is the Tamil word!)

So…do look around you if you are walking down country or wooded paths…if you collect the leaves of this vine (called “Mundakathan keerai” in Tamil), you will be doing yourself a good turn healthwise, if you include this in your diet!

Another surgery..and back home again

November 24, 2017

2 weeks after the surgery that I described

here

the knee injury that I had sustained in Madhya Pradesh (a young man boarding the train to Bangalore in a rush pushed me from behind, and I fell with my knee hitting the corner of a tin trunk, leaving me in excruciating pain) flared up again, and I could not even move a few steps.

I realized that the “settling” of the knee problem with antibiotics in September had not really solved the problem. So I went to the orthopaedic surgeon in Fortis while I was underoing the follow up after the surgery.

This surgeon did not give me any feeling of confidence, so I went back to Dr Ananda Murthy, the orthopaedic surgeon I had consulted in September.

I went only with the idea of having physiotherapy to clear the inflammation, but I soon had to change my mind. Dr Ananda Murthy clearly explained that I had a meniscus tear in my knee, and there was some other growth that he could see. I also mentioned the

Plica syndrome

the Dr J V Srinivas, the orthopaedic surgeon at Fortis Hospital, had found, and he said he would take care of that, too. He explained the process of

arthroscopy

clearly to me.

The decision made, I felt there was no point in delaying, and suffering. Friends took me to Shanthi Hospital which he asked me to go to, and was admitted. At noon, the arthroscopy was carried out, and I was discharged the next day (23rd November). The bill, by the way, was half was what Fortis would have charged! The hospital was small, pleasant, and quiet. Very clean, and a lovely private room with a view of a mango and a jamun tree! Good nursing staff, and good food (at reasonable rates for visitors,too).

With some amount of pain, Anjana took me to her home, but I found my knee progressing really well as the day wore on, and late that night, she drove me back home. I put some of the stuff away, let the others lie, and zonked out at 11pm…waking up only at 7.45am today (24th Nov) instead of getting up early and crossing the road to Dr Ananda Murthy’s clinic and being the first patient when the clinic opened at 7.30am!

I managed to cross the dangerous Bannerghatta Road and went to the clinic, where the doctor saw me and pronounced me fit to carry on normally. Both he and the physiotherapists at Shanthi Hospital and the clinic made the same statement:

“At your age, we usually have to tell people to walk more, and take the stairs, but we have to give you the reverse advice. At the outset, don’t walk more than 2 km per day, and be a little careful. After that, you are fine. We are impressed with your level of fitness..it’s closer to a 40-year-old.” That’s the kind of compliment that is very reassuring!

I underwent some physiotherapy, made the dangerous crossing (the road!) back home, and the compressive bandage having been removed, I felt such a sense of relief.

I had the hot-water bucket-bath of a lifetime,cleaning away all the plaster and bandage gums (oh how affectionately they cling!), tender massaging of the various stitches. This was followed by a self-pampering full-body moisturizing-cum-massage (done by me!)

I look at my body. Perfection in looks? No! So many bulges and bumps. So many places where the call of gravity is being heeded. So much efficient storage of fat. It doesn’t look anything like Miss World’s. But there is one great thing about it…it’s alive, it has carried me through 63 years of healthy life.

It has bounced back–fast– from so much that has been thrown at it, and it houses me in great comfort still.To me, this body is perfect. I will pamper it with a good lunch and a siesta now….or should I walk 2km to my daughter’s home and be with the grandchildren?

Notes from a freak accident on 021117

November 7, 2017

I am going crazy repeating to every person who is enquiring, “What Actually Happened?”

Well, here it is:

I was showering at 8 am in the morning when the six-foot by five-foot glass sliding door of my shower stall broke. No clue why.The glass had been installed 13 years ago, and was not safety glass. The shards sliced a deep gash in my hip, er, well, my bum, on the left side; on my right, gashes in my elbow and wrist, and (as the surgeons told me today) several internal and external cuts on my back and sides.

I am amazed by how coolly I reacted.I saw the shards of glass with bits of my skin, fat and blood all over the shower area, and knew that it was quite a bad situation.

The sliding door with its remaining shards of glass was stuck, so I had to carefully squeeze my way out. I then realized that I was losing blood at an alarming rate from the huge gash on my hip/bottom, so I wadded a lot of toilet tissue and held the gaping wound shut.

The shock of what happened meant that I had an urgent bowel movement. So I did that neatly, too, on the throne, no poop to add to the blood all over the bathroom.

I’d just put shampoo in my hair, so I washed that out in the washbasin.

Holding the hip wound but bleeding from the gashes on my elbow, wrist and back, I went to the room where the phone was, and called my daughter (I’d just wished her a while ago for her birthday). Since she was in the gym and could not be reached, I called up my son in law and told him it was an emergency, and that he should locate her and ask her to come pronto.

I switched off the geyser, the lights around the flat, picked up my purse with cash and debit cards in readiness. I put on underclothes, and an old kaftan, as I knew it would be soon blood-soaked.

I opened the door to my daughter when she arrived. I held another wad of tissue to the hip wound while she lined the front seat of the car with newspapers. She then drove me to Fortis Hospital on Bannerghatta Road. I knew that the hospital was a money-making concern, but I felt I had the best chance of finding good surgeons to operate, so I decided to go there. Indeed the surgeons were good, though some of the nursing was pathetic, and the administration unethical in the billing (more about this later).

The wound was taped shut in Emergency, and I was generally cleaned up. I was made to wait for three hours for a room as I was told the hospital was full. Once I was moved into the room, I was not allowed to have even a drink of water (I told the nurses that I’d had nothing since dinner at 7pm the previous night) because of impending surgery. I am sure that hunger and thirst added to the shock of my accident.

Fortis then insisted on prior payment of a large sum of money (Rs. 1,50,000) (this itself seems unethical to me) and refused to carry out the surgery without it. My daughter and my friends Jayashree and Nayantara, who’d also arrived at the hsopital, organized it. Jai and Nayantara went home, but my daughter had to stay with me.

Though surgery was thus delayed, I was wheeled in at 7.20pm, and the surgery, which took a little over an hour, went very well. I returned to consciousness and was brought back to the room at about 9.30pm. Jai, who came back in the evening, stayed with me while Anjana went home to get things organized for the children for the next day, and returned by 12.45 am, when Jai went home. Though the surgeon had told me that I could have food after midnight, the nurses would not allow me to eat or drink anything until 1 am. Jai’s suggestion of a glass of Horlicks was excellent and a life-restorer.

Anjana, suffering from cold and fever, was out like a light; luckily, I was able to go to the toilet on my own, and considering the injuries, spent a reasonable night.

The other patient in my room was a gentleman who was having his knee fixed after some wire had broken in the knee replacement. For some reason, he was suffering from a lot of gas, and my night was punctuated by unmusical and loud emissions. Sleep was out of the question.

At 5 am in the morning, the nurse came and switched on all the lights, waking everyone, including my ill and exhausted daughter, for no good reason that I could see. I switched off the lights again to let my daughter sleep. I had to fend off the staff who came to sweep and then mop the room, to ask if I needed a bedpan ( an offer which I was thankful to refuse), an ECG for me, and breakfast service. I then kept awake to prevent the staff taking away the breakfast tray, as I had saved some of it for my daughter when she woke up. I also had a few friends visiting. Sleep? Rest? What are those?

At 6 am, one of the surgeons, Dr Sinha, came to see me, and pronounced that I was doing fine and could go home the same day.

The nurse told me that I could not be discharged without the main surgeon’s “discharge sheet” and the discharge summary. However, she said, the paperwork for claiming the insurance would take 3-4 hours and I could not leave until it was completed. I asked why someome else could not collect the paperwork after I went. The response to this was, “Speak to our in-charge”… a person who never appeared. I made a big fuss until I got some attention, and the main surgeon, Dr Priyadarshan visited by noon, and pronounced me fit enough to be discharged.

At 11am,Anjana had woken up, and Jai returned. I warned Anjana that the hospital bill would be padded up, and at noon, after the surgeon’s visit they both went to Billing, where, sure enough, there was overcharging to the tune of about Rs.6,000. Two and a half hours were spent on this exercise and I was finally discharged.

I am back home now, and have been told not to lift weights with my right hand as a tendon has been cut in the wrist. Other than that. It’s just been… a pain in the a**! This describes the injury, the effects of the surgery, the 6- hour delay in discharging me… and the over-billing, to the tune of several thousand rupees.

I am now facing the daunting task of downloading several forms from the insurance company’s site, filling them up when my right wrist is tightly bandaged up, and making my insurance claim.

Update on 091117

I went to get my wounds re-dressed and we asked the surgeon what the surgical mesh was that had been used. The surgeon said he had not used any mesh. This was a charge of Rs.27,6000. With the earlier overbilling the total amount overcharged was Rs.32,100. The hospital was perfectly aware of what was being done. VERY unethical.

**********************

Sidelights (FB posts):

1.The surgeons were good at Fortis, Bannerghatta Rd.. I am comfortable.. But the rest.. awful. I am now bleeding from the spot where an incompetent nurse replaced the butterfly IV port. I am told that after the doctor ( no nurse will tell me when he might reasonably be expected) the insurance papers will take 3-4 hours and I cannot leave without them( I am not joking… I asked why I can’t send someone else to collect them, and was told it can’t be done!).…aaargh. The idea seems to be to keep me long enough to bill me for another day…and another, and another….

2.The doctors do their job efficiently, and then the patient passes into the hands of that monster, the Billing Dept. Today, it took 6 hours to get discharged. Fortis tried to bill me for: half a day’s room charge, meals that were not eaten, medication that the duty nurse took away before my eyes, and my daughter and my friend Jai, alert to this, found a total of nearly Rs.6000 over-billing. (the bill was around Rs.1,50,000).If, in the protracted, painful process of a patient’s discharge, one does not notice these ‘oversights’, one is the loser, literally and figuratively.

3.I found that the hospital staff had brought the mask used for my anasthesia back to my room. I decided to bring it back home. What a bonus! K2 added it to the doctor’s kit. I’ve just had my budpeser checked, my ears and eyes peered into, my heart and bristles(don’t ask me what those are!) listened to with the steth, and ofkose, with the mask, had a whole opewation done with a pair of large yellow tweezers, where my stomach was cut open but I did not die. I then told him to give me a bill, and he brought me some torn-up kitchen tissue to pay it with. The best opewation I have ever had.

4. One butterfly that I don’t like:

click here to view

5. I like to laugh….but I really didn’t need to be in stitches in the surgical way! Embroidered all over, l yet count myself lucky when I think where those glass shards could have fallen…and what damage they could have done.

6. A doctor friend called me up and asked why I had not given him a call immediately. He asked me to remember to call at once next time. I profoundly hope and pray that there will be no next time!

A most unusual young man….Rajdhani Express encounter, 131214

December 15, 2014

I always meet the most interesting people on train journeys (another reason why I prefer them to quick-yet-painful plane journeys in India.)

I got talking to three young men who were travelling up to Kazipet; they were working for Punjab National Bank and were on their way to a small town in Andhra to conduct training programs for other bank employees there. They would, they said, be continuously posted from town to town, when their final place of posting would be decided.

As I chatted, one of the young men, Ashwini Jha,

ashwin jha rjdhni 131214

talked more about himself, and I learnt some astounding facts.

He was extremely interested in electronics and was excellent at his studies.
At 11, inspired by the biography of the Ashok Chakra winner late Lt.Puneet Dutt of 11, Gorkha Rifles, developed an interest in firearms.
At the age of 12, developed ankylosing spondylosis…and was confined to bed for 4 incredibly pain-ridden years.
At 16, the family had to sell their property to enable him to have an Aortic Valve replacement surgery in Delhi, as the heart had been badly damaged by the disease (which still does not have a cure.)

In his own words, from a document he emailed me.

I am quoting:

“Why anyone die due to lack of a rupee for medicine when the other one spending Rs.10 or more on his onetime smoking?
Now to get rid of these all problem became the purpose of life for the boy. He determined hat e will serve the humanity and will change the scenario. He believed that if even a street dog is doing something for the society by eating roadside litter than why can`t an individual can do something for the betterment of society. He began searching the solution of these all problems and got that in the typical Indian way of living if a single person has the employment it can change the life of at least five other ones, means a single employment can address at least five persons problems (food, cloth, shelter, health and education) and with the good education those dependent five can address the problems of other 25 in the long run in the form of their own family, means few employments and a school can revolutionaries the life of hundreds of people….”

A lot of books that he read motivated him and “to know more about poverty, money, economy and finance” he took a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree.

He took up a job, but “in November 2012 he went through Hip Joint Replacement in which he faced serious troubles due to Pre – Cardiac problems”.

He took up a job again and quit in July 2013.

Once again, he studied for competitive exams and landed his (present)nationalized bank job. His thoughts are very different; instead of the usual elation, here are his words:

“Parents satisfied, the colony envious and villagers` proud….hahahaha…What a pity with India..a 30K p.a. job decides an individual’s worth,character and everything
else 😦 sad…his zeal ,concepts and dreams worth nothing but 30k!”

And now, this courageous, adventurous person says, “Now comparatively with good health …modern medical science ..hell pricious medicines,yoga..vipassana and physiotherapy is doing good with mind body and soul…Lets` see what next!”

Here is what he dreams in poetic form:

Dream Great

Ideas are not born in streets,

But they arise in your mind.

What they only need is the great dream

And a daring attitude

Now when the world badly needs heroes,

What are you looking for…

Come on dream great, do hard

And if you have the fire in your heart

Snatch the stars from the sky

ULTIMATELY, IF YOU CAN DREAM ANYTHING

YOU CAN DO ANYTHING

**************

Each person I meet on a journey is a story, but some stories are more amazing than others…I hope everyone is inspired by Ashwini Jha’s!

“Retirement”

September 22, 2014

We are having a discussion on retirement, with someone asking for thoughts from others. Various points of view, and tips for managing one’s life after one has quit one’s corporate career, were given. I decided to add this:

​I enjoyed this thread very much, as a person who’s never had a full-time career; I’ve been lucky to have a spouse earning the bread, and I’ve worked part-time at very different tasks, most of which were not very financially remunerative (yabbah, that word always gives me trouble…reMuNerative or reNuMerative? my mind keeps asking.) I agree with Sandy….there’s never any lack of things to do. The point is to also have enough in the bank to live as one wishes to do (also providing for a few emergencies along the way.)

Sometimes, the retirement can be thrust upon one. I’d like to share the experience of a very young friend of mine, Priyanka. She worked full-time for a (what else, in Bangalore?) software company until she was diagnosed with a hole in the heart, which could not be laparoscopically treated. Prior to surgery, she was also diagnosed with (I forget which type of) diabetes which had to be treated and stabilized. So…without any prior planning, it was a double whammy. She gave up her job, and the expenses, at the same time, shot through the roof. Even now, she has am injection each day, that is very expensive indeed.

But since she and her husband have always been “give back to society” people, she took all of it in a =most positive way. After she recovered from the surgery, she took up photography, which both of them were already reasonably proficient at; she did not have to invest in more expensive equipment. She cycled long distances.​ She’d always volunteered for several organizations, working with deprived children; ​she writes about recipes, particularly ones that she’s deve​loping for her present state of health.

Here’s one entry from her blog, if you are interested.

http://wanderingtastebuds.com/2014/06/11/wandering-with-healthy-taste-buds/

​She and her spouse help run a group that organizes screenings of ideology-based movies and documentaries every week in Bangalore. (It’s called Khula Manch, and everyone is welcome to the screenings.)

https://www.facebook.com/khulamanch

She’s probably 22 or 23 now. She’s set such a remarkable example for me, and for anyone else, on how to handle “retirement”. In comparison to her, those of us who can plan ahead for our non-corporate job careers are remarkably well off, I think.

Hats off to everyone who can turn their back on “careers” to pursue what they want to do. (Not everyone can, or should, do this.)

But a special tip of the hat who make the most of even the unexpected reverses in their lives, to do the same thing!

Summer, and surgery, 190814

August 20, 2014

Even if school has begun, summer evenings are fun times.

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Kobe is the little

Shih Tzu

(no, that’s not Shit Su, that name comes from the Chinese for Lion Dog!) that the neighbours, Sandy and Michael, have.

When the mother is very allergic to cats and dogs, the family can’t have pets, but the next best thing is playing with the Dog-Next-Door! (That’s Mike in the background.)

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As Sandy trims the lawn, Kobe (named after Kobe Bryant), frolics with KTB.

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Green grass and blue skies are made to run and jump around.

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And then sit and communicate, without words:

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Meanwhile, the brother goes into surgery for

adenoidectomy

not with any apprehension, but a huge joy at all the gadgets surrounding him!

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The toys in the children’s ward are great, too!

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And can you believe how chipper he is, back home in the evening after the surgery was successfully done:

Here’s our summer girl…

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and our surgery boy:

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Their smiles and play light up my heart!