Posts Tagged ‘birding’

Turahalli, 010718

July 1, 2018

The monsoons are when the peacocks, dance, and this morning, at Turahalli Reserve Forest, we were delighted to watch this.

Lists sent to Ms Dipika, DCF, Turahalli:

Bird list:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46912817

(47 species)

Butterflies:

Baronet
Blue, Babul
Blue, Lime
Blue, Pale Grass
Blue, Tiny Grass
Castor, Common
Cerulean, Common
Coster, Tawny
Crow, Common
Cupid, Small
Dart, Oriental Grass
Emigrant, Common
Gull, Common
Lime, Common
Leopard, Common
Mormon, Common
Pansy, Yellow
Pioneer
Rose, Common
Rose, Crimson
Tiger, Blue
Tiger, Plain
Tiger,Striped
Yellow, Common Grass
Yellow, Three-spot Grass

Insects:

Ants, Processional
Bee, Carpenter
Bee, Honey
Beetle,Bombardier
Beetle, Net-winged
Caterpillars of various moths and Common Rose
Centipede
Dragonfly, various
Grasshopper, various
Katydid
Mantis, Praying
Millipede
Plant Hopper
Praying Mantis
Spider, Funnel Web
Spider, Orb Weaver
Spider, Giant Wood
Spider, Jumping
Spider, Social
Spider, Tent Web
Spider, Wolf
Wasp, Paper
Wasp, Spider
Wasp, Scoliid

Wildflowers

Acacia sp
Aristolochia indica seen in a lot of places (this is an endangered plant)
Catunaregam spinosa
Commelina sp
Clerodendron sp
Cyanotis sp
Evolvulus sp
Grewia sp
Fungi and Mushrooms, various kinds
Mimosa pudica
Passiflora sp
Stachytarpeta
Toddelia asiatica
Tridax sp

FB album of the morning

here

Advertisements

Visit to FES for Grow-Trees, Kallimapalli, Karnataka, 230618

June 28, 2018

I got a call from my friend Srinvasa Shenoy, aka Srini, asking whether I would be interested in a visit to a site where afforestation is being done, near the Karnataka/Andhra Pradesh border, in a small village called Kollimapalli.

Since I am always interested in this kind of work, I asked a few friends too, and we set off. After a productive morning of birding at

Bhairasagara lake

which delayed us quite a bit, we drove to

Bagepalli

where we met Avinash Chowdary of

Foundation for Ecological Security (FES)

Srini tries to offset the carbon footprints of his clients in the travel company he runs, by donating to

Grow Trees

and wanted to see the planting efforts on the FES site. FES is the local partner of Grow Trees for planting trees as a part of its efforts in ecological restoration in co-ordination with local rural communities.

We found the tiny hamlet of Kollimapalli nestled in a rocky, scrubby landscape:

IMG_9951

Blue skies greeted us as we entered the tiny village and walked up the forest path.

IMG_9900

The local people whom we met said that what was earlier a barren, arid area was now quite green with the establishment of the scrub jungle, with planted trees growing well.

However”The objective,” says Srini, “is not about planting trees only – rather, it is a broader perspective of ecological restoration through water conservation, planning, planting trees (local and at the right place), educating the communities, providing expertise and then working along with them and the local government. It is all about providing a sustainable solution at the local level.”

Here we are (at the end of the site visit) :

IMG_9971

It is critical that the rules and practices resolved by the local panchayat are followed, for the success of the project, as they allow everyone to participate in the effort.

FES follows a system of CRPs (Community Resource Persons). CRPs are not employed full time – but devote about half of their time for a fixed payment. The CRPs monitor, report, and co-ordinate with local people. Each CRP is responsible for 4-5 villages. They have 350 villages under their project.
They have corporate sponsors like Grow-trees, Say Trees, HUF (Hindustan Unilever), Axis Bank etc.. – who fund them under their CSR budgets. The Community Resource Persons we met were

Grazing is allowed in certain areas, and others are ‘prohibited’ zones for grazing, to allow for vegetative regeneration. Here is a river of cattle flowing down one of the paths in the permitted area.

IMG_9875

The impact of all these efforts is felt when the local stakeholders accept the results; the results are synergetically more than just the number of trees planted to prevent erosion.

Efforts also include building of bunds/tanks at strategic locations to provide for water throughout the year, and providing for ‘cattle ponds’ at strategic locations. Here is Srini, talking to Avinash and the CRPs, at one such cattle pond, which had been dug before the monsoon.

IMG_9903

Without co-operation from the local community, merely planting trees (even if the trees are monitored) is of no point whatsoever and is doomed for failure. It was, therefore, heartening to see the good equation that has been developed with the villagers; we were welcomed, we enjoyed seeing the children of the village playing.

IMG_9966

After the visit, the hospitable people gave us some delicious buttermilk to slake our thirst!

IMG_9962

We found that FES had planted Neem, Jamun,Indian Gooseberry, and other species of trees suited to the rocky, rain-starved environment. On our walk around the area, here are several beautiful creatures which we spotted, proving that the place is, indeed, a haven for all kinds of wildlife.

Lynx Spider

IMG_9958

Small Salmon Arab

IMG_9955

Robberfly

IMG_9899

Sirkeer Malkoha

IMG_9938

Oriental Garden Lizard male

IMG_9881

Oriental Garden Lizard female

IMG_9917

Catunaregam spinosa, or Mountain Pomegranate:

IMG_9910

Givotia rottleriformis, or the White Catamaran tree (Butti Mara in Kannada)

IMG_9894

As we walked back, a flight of Painted Storks overhead delighted us.

IMG_9888

In spite of the challenges, Grow Trees and FES seem to be making an impact with their work with the twin goals of afforestation and conservation.

Bird lists:

For Bhairasagara, click

here

For Kollimapalli, click

here

For Gulur Lake, which we visited on our way home, click

here

4th Sunday outing, March ’18, and bird census: Hoskote kere, 250318

March 27, 2018

Email to bngbirds egroup:

IMG_3107

I had been toying with the idea of making Hoskote kere the venue for the 4th Sunday outing, when the email from Swaroop and his team arrived, announcing the bird count there. That made the decision easy, and several of us gathered at 6.30am at the Gangamma temple on the bund of the lake.
IMG_3120

We had a good mix of experts and newbies, children and adults, binoculars and bazookas 😀

IMG_3124

Swaroop and his team

IMG_3122

sent us in several directions, to see what we could see, and document what we saw. The paths were as as follows:

Dipu K, et al: north west edge
Rajneesh Suvarna, et al: Raghavendra Talkies
Vinay Bharadwaj, et al: east edge
Ashwin Viswanathan. et al: west edge:
Deepa Mohan, et al: Meeting point plus south-west edge

I was happy to take the children from Om Shri School along, as part of the initiative to involve schools.I found the children very interested; they patiently learnt how to use my binoculars, used the scope often, and asked a lot of questions too. I was able to show them almost all the birds that we sighted, and the bird scope was used well!

I started off with group, looking at the woodland birds in the plant clutter on both sides of the road. As the mist slowly lifted, we walked down the path with the lake waters along both sides. I have never before been able to walk past the "isthmus" that juts out into the water; in fact, a couple of months ago, the lake was so brimful of water that birders could not go down at all, and had to be content with birding from the bund along the Gangamma temple.

Robins, sunbirds, prinias and others were pointed out but then we got a few Baillon's Crakes

IMG_3157

in the water hyacinth at water level, and most of us got busy clicking these usually skulky and shy birds, which will soon begin their migration.

IMG_3169

IMG_3169

Garganeys

IMG_3237

But our "regulars"….the Spot-billed Pelicans, Little Grebes, Coots, and Herons (like this Grey Heron)

IMG_3119

kept us all occupied as we watched them. There were Black and Brahminy Kites in the air, joined by a lone Marsh Harrier, another winter visitor which was looking for prey. Rosy Pastors

IMG_3212

flew over the water and settled in the dry trees. We saw Barn Swallows,

IMG_3256

as well as the Red-rumped, Wire-tailed, and Streak-throated variety.

It was nice to see both kinds of Jacanas, Pheasant-tailed

IMG_3223

IMG_3221

and Bronze-winged,

IMG_3198

in the lake; similarly, Yellow, Grey and White-browed Wagtails flew around. One "dip" was the Pied Kingfisher, but we spotted the Small Blue and the White-throated Kingfishers.

Glossy Ibis

IMG_3209

Blyth's Reed Warbler

IMG_3204

Schoolchildren, along with the teacher, using the scope and binoculars

IMG_3235

Our group

IMG_3258

The children of Om Shri School

IMG_3263

Sandpipers, too, made their appearance, flying around with their typical calls. We noted Egrets, both Intermediate and Small. Spot-billed Ducks and Garganeys flew over the water and settled down, and were quite easy to show to the children. In fact, I was wondering if the children, or the schoolmaster who accompanied them, could take so many names thrown at them at the same time! I know I would have found it difficult to remember. But their interest did not flag, and after a certain point, it was I who had to call them back to return. It is very satisfying to be able to show people a whole lot of birds on their first outing!

Ants

IMG_3246

Water cabbage, an acquatic plant:

IMG_3185

Line-up of many of my group:

IMG_3267

Valli and Janhvi helped me with the app and physical paper entries, and we had to catch up with the bird names every now and then, as each of us spotted different birds! It was nice to have a problem of plenty.

Fish caught at the lake is sold on the bund every morning.

IMG_3268

Children on the lake reaches

IMG_3183

An array of snacks, including Manoj's mom-made alu parathas, kept us going.

IMG_3240

Return we did, to a hearty breakfast provided by the Karnataka Forest Department (KFD).

IMG_3269

Some of the teams whose transects were further afield did not return for a while, but all of us were very satisfied birders that morning! It sometimes happens that some paths have less birds ( on a census/bird count, it's our duty just to record what see, whether the numbers are lower or higher) but it's a great feeling when everyone returns with a satisfactory count of species. One group sighted the Eurasian Wryneck, which is a new bird-sighting for this lake.

Thanks to Valli, I met Arun and his friend, from the Andamans, and they gave us insights into the birding scene where they come from.

Our grateful thanks to Swaroop and team who provided us a great opportunity to see the variety of birds that Hoskote kere has to offer. Swaroop, Praveen and Nagabhushana say that 126 species were sighted during the morning, by over 120 volunteers! A big thank you for providing this opportunity for the 4th Sunday outing.

IMG_3276

Fishing boats

IMG_3118

For the next few months, we will concentrate more on the resident birds in and around our city, and bid goodbye to our winter visitors.

The eBird checklist for my group is

here

Swaroop will provide the links to the other checklists.

I have put up my photographs (not by a DSLR camera, and not only birds…there is even a photo of some beautiful ants!) on my FB album,

here

Cheers, Deepa.

Bannerghatta National Park, Monthly Bird Survey, 100318

March 13, 2018

Since I was not able to go for the inaugurual (Feb ’18) monthly bird survey, I went to participate in the March survey.

The survey is across four ranges, Anekal, Bannerghatta, Harohalli and Kodigere, and will be held on the second Saturday of every month for a year, to give a holistic picture of bird life in the Bannerghatt National Park over the annual period.

IMG_1973
Birds of Karnataka, display board at Kalkere.

IMG_1978
Volunteers gathering for the survey

I got the Kalkere State Forest transect, BTL (Bannerghatta Transect Line) 1. My team-mates were:

Forest Guard Michael
Albert Ranjith
Byomakesh Palai
Pervez Younus

IMG_1980
Michael, Pervez,Byomakesh, Albert

We stopped every 10 minutes, took the GPS co-ordinates, and then moved on.

IMG_1991

The Kalkere State Forest was much more productive in terms of birds than I thought it would be, because the city has actually spread beyond this forest patch now.

IMG_2025

We passed some quarried rock, which gave a sad look to the landscape.

IMG_2024

However, the good thing was that the depressions had formed rock pools:

IMG_2019

Our trail was quite scenic, even if it was not heavy forest:

IMG_2033

However, the scrub forest was very interesting, and we got several birds. Here are some I managed to click.

Greater or Southern Coucal, drinking water at the edge of the rock pool:

IMG_2022

Oriental White-eye:

IMG_1988

Shikra:
IMG_2002

Green Bee-eater:

IMG_2011

Jerdon’s Bushlark:

IMG_2052

Black-winged Kite:

IMG_2038

Oriental Honey Buzzard:

IMG_2045

Indian Peafowl (this is a peacock in the glory of full breeding plumage):

IMG_2014

Vipin was our organizer for the Bannerghatta range, and I found him very sincere and hard-working. Here he is, taking notes with a forest guard:

IMG_2032

An excellent breakfast of iddli was provided midway through the transect:

IMG_2036

I did not restrict myself to observing only the birds; here are some other interesting beings:

Milkweed:
IMG_2043

Peninsular Rock Agama:

IMG_2044

Two unidentified but beautiful flowering plants:

IMG_2046

This was a tiny plant growing in the path!

IMG_2007

An un-id insect with huge eyes:

IMG_2059

A dragonfly:

IMG_2034

the Flame of the Forest, Butea monosperma, in full bloom:

IMG_1989

Tired, but mentally refreshed by the morning, and the beauty of the scrub forest

IMG_2012

I left for Mysore to take part in the Ranganathittu Bird Census the next morning.

The Flickr album of the survey is

here

and my FB album is

here

Location, location, location!

January 11, 2018

Where, oh, where can I say that I saw
In the capital city of Karnataka….
Those rare ornithological specimens that I click.
Usually not in the city, but far!

I worry, you see, that others might spy
And click …and disturb…those beautiful birts.
But I don’t want to keep the location to myself.
So of course,I say, “Bangalore Outskirts.”

Whether it’s the hills, the forests or the valley
Or any of the few remaining lakes…the wirts
That are written under those superb photographs, are always
Those teasing ones: “Bangalore Outskirts”.

Bangalore-for-birders is a shy maiden: Not for her
Those see-through tees or off-the-shoulder shirts.
You may get only a peep at some shy part of a birt
Under those far-reaching “Bangalore Outskirts”.

So I feel happy I’m sharing the info with the world
Of fellow Bangalore-birders till it hurts:
But still I know I will never give away
The actual location of those “Bangalore Outskirts”.

I rest easy in mind; I am the only ethical birder.
All the rest of them are irresponsible disaster-alerts.
Let them try to find the bird I found! I defy them
By telling them I found it in the “Bangalore Outskirts”.

Bird-name puzzles

December 26, 2017

1. Most rich people can travel to see this bird. (7)….
Ostrich (it’s in the sentence).
2. Tailless pipe…it is the bird. (5)….
Pipit (Tailless “pipe” is pip, and add “it”)
3.The pigs got in a mess, wallowing in the mud.(7)….
Swallow (it’s in the sentence).
4. Bird you can see in a bowling alley (3)….
Owl. (It’s in the sentence).
5. Bird makes endlessly boring mixture.(5)….
Robin. (Endlessly, “boring” is “borin” and a mixture of that is “robin”.
6.According to some people, this bird sounds like a “moo”…
Coucal (some pronounce it “cow call”)(6).
7. Colourful wolf pea? (7)…
Peafowl (anagram of “wolf pea”).
8. Will it give you an e-rebate? (3,5)…
Bee-eater (anagram of “e rebate”) .
9. Part of the Gretel and Hansel story? (5)….
Egret (it’s in the sentence).
10. Brawler roughing it up? (7)….Warbler (anagram of brawler).

Nature walk for Munchkins Montessori, Puttenahalli kere, 151217

December 15, 2017

Letter to Chanda of Munchkins:

Hi Chanda,

The walk went very well. It was very nice to meet Priti, Mythili, Anna and others.

IMG_5765

List of various beings seen:

Birds:

Cormorant, Great

IMG_5772

Cormorant, Little
Egret, Cattle
Egret, Little
Heron, Pond
Kite, Common
Moorhen, Purple
Sunbird, Purple-rumped
Tailorbird, Common
Warbler, Greenish

Butterflies:

Bob, Chestnut
Cerulean, Common
Castor, Common
Emigrant, Common
Jezebel, Common
Lacewing, Common (eggs)
Leopard,Common
Pansy, Lemon

IMG_5766

Lime, Common
IMG_5770

Tiger, Plain
Tiger, Striped
Yellow, Common Grass

IMG_5775

Fishes:
Tilapia

Insects:

Bees
Damselflies
Dragonflies
Spiders
Wasps

IMG_5782

Trees and Plants

Bougainvillea
Badminton Ball
IMG_5768

Date Palm
Fig Tree
Honge
Mahogany
Neem
Pride of India
Sampige
Singapore Cherry

I talked about leaf composting, clearing weeds in the lake, the way birds’ beaks have different shapes, water and woodland birds, differences in leaves and tree bark, and about how much effort it takes to maintain a lake.

When I conduct walks I generally take far fewer photos. I have posted the photos on my FB album

here

Please share this link with the others.

Looking forward to future association with all of you…the children were truly delightful!

Cheers, Deepa

Crows using vehicles to crack seed pods! Ragihalli, 211017

December 5, 2017

I had read about how crows put nuts and seed pods in the way of approaching vehicles on roads and then eat the cracked nut.

here

is a very erudite study which does not rule out the possibility of crows using vehicles in this way, but suggests that they only drop the nuts on the road to crack them.

However, at the Ragihalli sheet rock area in the Bannerghatta National Park, on 21 Oct. ’17, we observed a Jungle Crow which definitely seemed to use the oncoming vehicles to crack the tamarind seeds that it was bringing, and then going to the road to eat the exposed soft tamarind.

Here’s the crow, which deliberately (and fearlessly) the crow leaves the seed pod and flies off only when the vehicle is almost upon it.

Here, the crow flies in after the vehicle has passed. You can clearly hear the excellent description of the crow’s behaviour by my friend Aishwary Mandal in the video.

Birding is not “ticking off” birds that we’ve seen…it’s also watching and learning more about the feathered creatures around us…sometimes they surprise us with what they do.

Savandurga, 081017

October 11, 2017

It was just four of us: Padma, Ramaswamy, Srini and I… who decided to go to

Savandurga

on a misty monsoon morning.

IMG_2133

Sign in Kannada for our destination:

IMG_2130

The mist in the trees…

IMG_2119

Which slowly cleared up:

IMG_2076

Our activities attracted a lot of attention!

IMG_2089

We did see a lot of birds…here are some.

Black Drongos

IMG_2081

This Ashy Prinia presented a cartoony view.

IMG_2069

Green Bee-eater with dragonfly catch

IMG_2125

Laughing Dove

IMG_2132

The butterflies were out in force, too!

Yellow Orange-tip

IMG_2139

IMG_2190

Dark Blue Tiger

IMG_2155

Plain Tiger caterpillar

IMG_2090

Pointed Ciliate Blue

IMG_2157

IMG_2175

Common Wanderer

IMG_2182

Dark Grass Blue

IMG_2165

Common Gull

IMG_2187

Here’s Srini, delighted with the way a butterfly trustingly climbed on to his finger (if one wipes one’s perspiration off, they are attracted to the minerals in the fluid)

IMG_2253

That was the Pointed Ciliate Blue again.

IMG_2250

Some of the insects we saw included this White-tailed Damselfly

IMG_2108

and this beautiful Copper Beetle (at least, that’s what I named it!)

IMG_2113

Wildflowers were varied and plentiful.

IMG_2111

Here’s a lovely Balloon Vine:

IMG_2123

Mexican Poppy

IMG_2137

Gossypium sp (Mallow)

IMG_2239

Waterlilies in a pond

IMG_2268

Even seed pods can look stunning

IMG_2263

Mushrooms

IMG_2100

Dabbaguli was one of the places we stopped at

IMG_2068

And just outside the town, we spotted a bonus…the Jungle Nightjar!

IMG_2145

IMG_2143

IMG_2146

Padma brought her tasty cutlets, and we feasted on them

IMG_2140

Later we also had some local breakfast.

IMG_2207

We stopped near two old temples, the Shaivite sAvaNdi veerabhadraswAmy and bhadrakAlamma temple

IMG_2218

and the Vaishnavite Lakshmi Narasimha temple

IMG_2225

Here’s narasimhA, the man-lion avatAr of Vishnu, with His consort Lakshmi, who is his laptop…

IMG_2231

The deities were being taken out in procession, which was a nice bonus.

IMG_2266

This life-like dog in a vendor’s stall nearly had me fooled.

IMG_2228

Part of this temple seemed lost in dreams of another time….

IMG_2215

Some rather risky rock-climbing was going on.

IMG_2226

The scenery was stunning:

IMG_2213

IMG_2199

IMG_2200

It was on the rocky outcrop in the centre that we spotted three Egyptian vultures.

IMG_2291

IMG_2289

IMG_2283

IMG_2280

We returned home, well pleased with our morning, stopping to say “bye” to this Oriental Garden Lizard which also seemed to be having a swinging time.

IMG_2312

Looking forward to the next weekend outing…!

Valley Outing, 021017

October 10, 2017

Gandhiji said India lives in her villages, but today, on the anniversary of his birth, we decided that she also lives in the variety of life forms that she has!

Aishwary, Ajit, Kumar, Padma, Prem, Ramaswamy, Venkatesh and I

IMG_1440

tarried a little on our way to the Valley as the mist hung heavy in the air. However, by the time we signed in the register at the gate and walked along the path, the weather had cleared up a little.

Whether or not we sighted any moving creature…the sheer burst of greenery had us mesmerized! Everywhere was a clean, washed green, with diamonds sparkling wherever we looked. Raindrops stood on everything…blades of grass, tiny insects and butterflies, and on the wildflowers too.

IMG_1467

I always feel that one of the best times to go for a nature walk is when the rain is about to stop. The insects and butterflies come out to make the most of the sun, and the birds come out to make the most of the insects…a lot of action happens at every level, on the ground, in the air…on a small and large scale. This was what happened this morning.

Spiders lay in wait for unwary flies or butterflies;

IMG_1448
Neoscona Spider with her egg-case

dragonflies, visiting us from Africa,

IMG_1461

Globe Skimmer aka Wandering Glider….this has migrated from Africa. It takes four generations to complete the migratory cycle.

Pantala flavescens

zipped along in the air, looking for food.

IMG_1445
Ichneumon (Parasitoid) Wasp.

IMG_1494

Ladybird.

Birds breakfasted on whatever they could find, on the trees, under the leaves, and in the air.

An unusual visitor for the Valley was an Oriental Darter flying overhead, which “opened our account.” A greedy Red-whiskered Barbet,

IMG_1472

A Black Drongo mobbing a White-cheeked Barbet, several Green Bee-eaters,a dancing Fantail Flycatcher

IMG_1489

(why it’s called a Fantail Flycatcher)

a preening Spotted Dove,

IMG_1482

with Ashy Prinias singing,

IMG_1468

and a Brahminy Skink (the only reptile we saw)

IMG_1455

a White-browed Bulbul

IMG_1480

made us wait in the area before the first banyan tree for a while; but then we went further down the path. With so much to observe and enjoy, from different kinds of spiders and their webs, dragonflies, plants of all kinds, a couple of Blue-faced Malkohas(giving Prem his first sighting of these skulky birds),

How we usually see Malkohas!

IMG_1607

Occasionally,when they can be seen better…

IMG_1610

by the time we reached the abandoned house, it was past 9am! Well-rewarded, we stopped to share our snacks, and then went further to the bamboo thicket.

For the first time in many years, I saw the stream of the Valley in good force, with a lot of water gushing over the stones and along the gully in the bamboo thicket.

IMG_1637

The song of the Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher and a brief hello from the White-rumped Shama filled in the audio part of our outing.

By now, the butterflies were out, too, making the most of the weak sunshine to recharge themselves, or mud-puddling along the path.

IMG_1509
Zebra Blue

IMG_1511

Bush Brown

IMG_1549

Common Lime

IMG_1530

Pointed Ciliate Blue

IMG_1538

Common Pierrot

IMG_1630

Common Silverline

IMG_1564

Danaid Eggfly female

IMG_1564

Common Line Blue on Tephrosia purpurea

IMG_1587

The Common Crows were out in full force, and we managed to catch sight of one Double-branded one as well. Emigrant numbers were lower than in the past weeks, but a Dark Blue Tiger appeared too. It was easy to show our friends why a butterly was called the Pale Grass Blue when it had its wings open to the sunlight!

IMG_1625

Common Hedge Blues also flashed their bright upper wings for us instead of sitting folded up as usual. Aishwary was a great help in singing the Blues!

IMG_1617

IMG_1490

Aishwary (left) helping out.

I saw the unusual sight of a Chocolate and a Lemon Pansy executing a pas de deux as they mud puddled together. Some of the butterflies were fresh and colourful specimens, some were tattered, dull survivors of battles with predators.

Other insects:

IMG_1645

Ichneumon (parasitoid) wasp. Look at that ovipositor! I wouldn’t like that wasp positing any ova on (or in) me!

IMG_1555

Robber Fly

IMG_1650

Stag Beetle

We noticed some beautiful plants and wildflowers

IMG_1555

Cassia mimoisedes

IMG_1515

Pseudarthria viscida

IMG_1540

Cyanotis sp.

IMG_1559

Indigofera nammularifolia:

IMG_1648

(what a long name for a very tiny flower)

We returned to our regular lives, much refreshed and energized by the sights and sound, the touch of different kinds of leaves, the taste of ripe Passion fruit, and the aroma of several flowers. Truly, a treat for the senses!

Beginning my morning chores, reminiscing about the wonderful outing, and already looking forward to what the next weekend may bring!

IMG_1449

The eBird list, compiled by Ajit, is

here

Butterflies:
Blue, Common Hedge
Blue, Pale Grass
Blue, Pointed Ciliate
Blue, Zebra
Bush Brown
Castor, Common
Cerulean, Common
Crow, Common
Crow, Double-branded
Eggfly, Danaid
Emigrant, Common
Gull, Common
Jezebel, Common
Lime, Common
Orange-tip, Plain
Orange-tip, White
Orange-tip, Yellow
Pansy, Chocolate
Pansy, Lemon
Pansy, Yellow
Pierrot, Common
Pioneer
Psyche
Rose, Common
Rose, Crimson
Silverline, Common
Skipper, Indian
Tiger, Dark Blue
Tiger, Plain
Tiger, Striped
Wanderer, Common
Yellow, Common Grass
Yellow, Spotless Grass
Yellow, Three-spot Grass

I’ve put up the photos of the birds, butterflies, insects, plants, a single reptile and us mammals,
here