Posts Tagged ‘behaviour’

Superdog, 160417

April 17, 2017

As I returned
From an outing, back home
I chanced upon this sight
Of a superhero on the roam.

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I didn’t click the owner,
A proud-looking man, whose
Idea it was, to
Put the dog in four shoes.

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Though the pet seemed OK
And actually did strut
Proudly along, I’d never
Dress up any mutt!

A dog should be a dog
I feel, not an ape
Of any human being..
Whatever size and shape!

Home-maker, Doresanipalya Reserve Forest, 120317

March 12, 2017

We saw a White-cheeked Barbet, idle, and free.

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It seemed to suddenly twist itself, right towards the tree.

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I’d wished to see a woodpecker, and as if granting that wish
It pecked to make a nesting-hole, work that it seemed to relish!

Here’s the bird, hard at work, rat-tatting away.

“Go and build your own home!” is what it seemed to say!

Yes, we took its sage advice and homeward went our way,
But the thought of the home-building barbet we carry through the day.

Compare and contrast, 2017

February 2, 2017

Contrasting, in my mind, the tennis match that happened between two men, recently in Australia, and the US Presidential election process over the past year.

One was played fairly, by the rules, both parties were excellent at what they did,and would bring lustre to the title they won. There were no personal attacks, no smears, the process of winning the title was completely transparent.

The other….

Captivity over freedom: Grey Francolins, Jigani Lake, 181216

December 18, 2016

Something strange on the 3rd Sunday outing to Jigani kere today.

We saw a young man with 2 Grey Francolins in a cage, and when I walked up to the group, everyone told me how they voluntarily came back into the cage when the young man let them out. Well, once again, the young man let them out, and this time, both birds flew quite a distance before landing in the field. I couldn’t believe that the Francolins would be captive again…but stood and watched the young man approaching the area where they were,they voluntarily came back into the cage when the young man let them out.

On this video, you can see the first Francolin just inside the cage, and the second walk in to the cage, with no force or persuasion! DoSomething strange on the 3rd Sunday outing today (Sun, 18 Dec 2016) at Jigani kere.

We saw a young man with two Grey Francolins in a cage, and when I walked up to the group, everyone told me ho the birds get so used to captivity that they prefer it to an uncertain freedom?

Here’s the Francolin, outside the cage:

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Here’s the video:

Regarding the outing, the

eBird checklist for Jigani kere is

here

eBird checklist for Hennagara is

here

the FaceBook Album is

here

and the Flickr album is

here

The Red-breasted Flycatcher, Nandi Hills, 241214

December 24, 2014

This morning, I went with Savithri Singh, her son Kartik and his friend Karuna, Brinda, and Sharmila, to Nandi Hills.

Though it certainly didn’t rain birds, we saw enough to keep us quite happy, and one of the highlights of the outing was the

RED-THROATED FLYCATCHER

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that flew about, delighting us.

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I wanted to find the difference between the Red-breasted and the Red-throated Flycatcher, and I read that the Red-breasted Flycatcher is Ficedula parva ,” is a small passerine bird in the Old World flycatcher family. It breeds in eastern Europe and across central Asia and is migratory, wintering in south Asia:…. and “the Asian species, Ficedula albicilla, previously considered a subspecies of the red-breasted flycatcher, has the red throat surrounded by grey and a different song. It is usually now separated as the Taiga flycatcher.”

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Why Taiga? Because…this bird goes to breed in Poland! However, one disturbing fact is that
“Studies on their spring arrivals to the breeding quarters in Poland from 1973–2002 show that males are returning earlier with increasing temperatures.”

They are found mainly deciduous woodlands, especially near water. They build an open nest in a tree hole or similar recess. 4–7 eggs are laid.

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The

Wiki entry

about the Taiga Flycatcher has this to say:

“In winter they are mostly silent but have a typical chip-chip-chr-rrr flycatcher call. In their breeding season, the song consists of melodious whistles, like that of the European pied flycatcher.”

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For other photos from the outing, click on my FB album

here .

Using others’ homes, Road to Galibore, 201214

December 22, 2014

While birding on the road to Galibore, Karnataka,on the banks of the Kaveri, in the Cauvery Wild Life Sanctuary (CWLS), we obseved some abandoned nests of the Baya Weavers.

We found that some Scaly-breasted Munias were now using the nests, and for a while, we watched these little beauties flying into, and away, from the nests.

A little later, though, our attention was arrested by the call of a

RUFOUS TREEPIE

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which we found flying from nest to nest.

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It kept picking at the dried grass that made up the nests:

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I could not understand whether it was foraging for insects in the grasses, or if it was unpicking the grass reeds to use in a nest of its own.

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At one point, I found the bird actually putting its head into the opening of one of the nests, as if to try and get in.

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Here’s the Treepie on the nest:

I took another one, too:

The

Wiki entry on this bird

does not mention anything about this behaviour. I wonder if I could get some more information about this…was the bird just being opportunistic?

The bird list of this trip. on eBird is at

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20983466

Another unexpected hunting scene, Gurgaon, 131214

December 13, 2014

I have made

this post

about taking an infant for a walk in her stroller, and coming upon a raptor with a kill.

Little did I know that history would repeat itself!

It is cloudy and gloomy at Gurgaon, and instead of sitting idly in the 19th floor, apartment, I decided to get some exercise by climbing down, walking around the building, and then climbing back.

As I walked on the pathway around the building, which is shaded by small tree, I was thrilled to see a Shikra which had just made a pigeon kill!

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I dared not go too close.

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It looked around for a bit, and then carried the pigeon across the barbed wire fence to the ground of the adjacent apartment building. In the process, it dropped its prey.

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However, I was able to click it, waiting for several unheeding people to go past before it dropped down out of my sight, presumably to pick up its food and go off.

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That was quite an unexpected bonus of the walk, and I never felt the 19 floors I climbed up, afterwards!

The photos are on my FB album

here

A light breakfast, Forest Park, 140914

September 15, 2014

After I caught sight of the Osprey fishing in the Grand Basin in Forest Park, my friend Danny Brown pinged me, and we arranged to go to Forest Park again on Sunday to try our luck.

As he went to park the car near the Visitors Center, I caught sight of this

COOPER’S HAWK

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An unfortunate bird had become prey to the talons and beak of this raptor, and was being polished off on top of a light fixture!

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The Cornell Lab of Ornithology says, Cooper’s Hawk, Accipiter cooperii, is “A medium-sized hawk with the classic accipiter shape: broad, rounded wings and a very long tail. In Cooper’s Hawks, the head often appears large, the shoulders broad, and the tail rounded.”

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From the yellow eye, it was apparent that this was a sub-adult.

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This bird was named after the naturalist William Cooper, one of the founders of the New York Lyceum of Natural History.

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Their breeding range extends from southern Canada to northern Mexico.

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The sun was coming up behind the bird, and I experimented with taking the shots against it:

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The wiki says, “These birds capture prey from cover or while flying quickly through dense vegetation, relying almost totally on surprise. One study showed that this is a quite dangerous hunting style.” They even prey on other raptors if they can, or small mammals.

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During their flight displays the male will begin by diving toward the female. A slow speed-chase follows involving the male flying around the female exposing his expanded under tail coverts to her. The male raises his wings high above the back and flies in a wide arc with slow, rhythmic flapping. Courting usually occurs on bright, sunny days, in midmorning…not at all surprising weather for romance!

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Over a two-week period the pair builds the nest, and the female incubates the eggs between 30 to 36 days.

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Cooper’s hawks have been known to live as long as 12 years in the wild, and rarely fall prey to other raptors like Red-tailed Hawks, Great Horned Owls, Peregrine Falcons, Golden Eagles, and Northern Goshawks.

The Cooper’s hawk, as a natural predator of almost any North American bird smaller than itself, can inadvertently deplete populations of rarer, conservation-dependent species. The American kestrel, whose populations have experienced considerable decrease, is one species in which the extensive predation by the recovered Cooper’s hawk population is a major concern. So this is one instance where conservation has had another side to it!

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We left this fascinating bird of prey to the remnants of its meal, and went on our way.

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Children, STL, 230814

August 24, 2014

When I say my grandson is de-lightful, I mean it!

After this, he started figuring out how to open the front door, and make good his escape…

And here’s KTB,singing a very old movie song:

The original, with the horrific images of the man of the house beating up his wife and kid, here:

I’ve not taught Boodi Ma the 2nd stanza, talking about how the father, after his bout of anger, will call the child..I am deeply disturbed by the culture that this song shows.

The Booda is not yet very verbal, so his singing videos will have to wait…

House Sparrows having a mud-bath, Forest Park, 110814…and others

August 12, 2014

Sparrows mud bathing:

Here’s my video of two of these perky creatures, one of whom is not happy with what she sees in the rear-view mirror. This was from Ragihalli, 160110.

One of them having baths in water, from JLR, Kabini, 210710:

Finally, a video of them having a grass bath, replete with one Lousy Jokku from me (“Rice Baath” is the name of a Karnataka dish) , also from the same visit to Kabini: